Item account not registered or doesn't have a view.php file.

Ethics of Euthanasia in pastoral care

Ethics of Euthanasia in pastoral care

Ethics of Euthanasia in pastoral care

Write a six page paper on the Pastoral care and euthanasia ethics. What are some approaches a pastor might take to this?What theological issues are there? Describe euthanasia. How have other churches handled this, including the United Methodist Church? What advantages does euthanasia have? What, if any, moral conundrums exist?What theological problems are there, and how do we approach them in pastoral practice?

Only use Scholarly credible sources and Use Turabian style citations with footnotes. If you don’t know what that is look it up because if it is not right I am not paying for it.  No plagiarism at all. If there is plagiarism I will report it and ask for a refund immediately and I will leave you a bad review.  Ethics of Euthanasia in pastoral care

13.1% Results of plagiarism analysis from 2019-04-30 14:00 UTC

Euthanasia Dr. Koppel.docx

Date: 2019-04-30 13:58 UTC

 All sources 14  Internet sources 14

[0]  https://juicyecumenism.com/2018/11/07/methodists-catholics-unite-euthanasia/

6.2% 7 matches

[1]  https://fletchergreg.wordpress.com/author/fletchergreg/page/3/

4.8% 11 matches

[2]  https://epdf.tips/assisted-dying-reflect…law-amp-ethics-.html

1.8% 5 matches

[3]  https://jme.bmj.com/content/44/7/491

0.0% 3 matches Ethics of Euthanasia in pastoral care.

[4]  https://reference.medscape.com/viewpublication/6757_12

0.2% 3 matches

[5]  https://archive.org/stream/systemofmedicine07allb/systemofmedicine07allb_djvu.txt

0.7% 1 matches  1 documents with identical matches

[7]  https://www.readbyqxmd.com/journal/26539/8

0.0% 2 matches  1 documents with identical matches

[9]  https://academic.oup.com/jlb/CrossRef-CitedBy/906681

0.0% 2 matches

[10]  https://www.researchgate.net/publication…onse_to_commentaries

0.0% 2 matches

[11]  connection.ebscohost.com/c/editorials/11…cratic-code-obsolete

0.0% 2 matches  4 documents with identical matches

[16]  https://jme.bmj.com/content/medethics/44/7/491.full.pdf

0.0% 1 matches

[17]  https://www.researchgate.net/publication…ed_ethics_literature

0.0% 1 matches

[18]  https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00431-017-2934-8

0.0% 1 matches

[19]  https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0167494317302790

0.0% 1 matches  1 documents with identical matches

7 pages, 1930 words Ethics of Euthanasia in pastoral care.

PlagLevel: 13.1% selected / 15.1% overall 28 matches from 21 sources, of which 21 are online sources.

Settings Data policy: Compare with web sources Sensitivity: Medium Bibliography: Consider text Citation detection: Reduce PlagLevel Whitelist: — Ethics of Euthanasia in pastoral care

1 Ethics of Euthanasia in pastoral care

Euthanasia

Death is an ordinary part of human life, and it is unavoidable and universal. [2] 1Sometimes

death comes undoubtedly and in a way that is unexpected and sometimes it comes gently after a

long and fruitful life. In some instances, death is associated with struggle, illnesses and to come

to terms with death includes the challenge of dealing with the physical and emotional pain of

both the individual that is dying and the people that are closer to the individual. Ethics of Euthanasia in pastoral care Euthanasia

denotes to the act of termination of someone’s life deliberately in a bid to reduce the suffering

that the individual is going through. The common phrase that is used contemporarily is the right [2]

to die, and this means that an individual can request for a doctor to end their life. The objective

of this paper is to assess the issue of euthanasia in pastoral care.

Theological Problems of Euthanasia

Most of the social values were previously contingent on the Biblical creation view, and

most of the cultures were established on these principles. Genesis 9:6 was informative for

humanity forbearers, and that should be for the contemporary society as well. The chapter points

out that whoever sheds the blood of a human, the same human shall shed his blood because the

1 Cuman, Giulia, and Chris Gastmans. “Minors and euthanasia: a systematic review of argument-based ethics

[17] Ethics of Euthanasia in pastoral care

literature.” 176, no. 7 (2017): 837-European journal of pediatrics 847.

Ethics of Euthanasia in pastoral care.

2 Ethics of Euthanasia in pastoral care

person was made in the image of God. The scripture prohibits one from taking another person’s

life. The fact that God creates humanity means that they are stewards of their lives and not the

owners of their life. Being created in the image of God means that the presence of humanity has

an everlasting purpose that is set apart and maintained by God. Because God creates humanity

means that the lives of human beings have intrinsic and immeasurable value. Because people are

created in the liking of God, people tend to have God dignity that is inherent, and this is a far cry

from the unstable self-esteem that is depending on prosperity and capabilities that is always

misguided by people in the society that are not Christians.

A perilous subject rises at this opinion as nonspiritual humanism contends that every

single life has an eminence that is emotionally involved to it. Situations, capabilities, suffering or

other influences render life experience better or worse because an individual has a lesser or

greater notch of happiness and satisfaction. With satisfaction and joy as the standard, some lives

tend to have a low eminence that it becomes rational to prefer death. And this is the contrast of

the scarcity of life that points out that every life that is formed in the image of God has God-

given and intrinsic worth that cannot be abridged by settings which in this case is euthanasia. In

the world that the right to trail delights is confused with the non-existent power to achieve

satisfaction, Christian perspective stands out in stark contrast.

United Methodist on Euthanasia

The church has in the past rejected euthanasia and any pressure on ending lives through

the process. The church focuses on the duty that is vested upon Christians to offer pastoral care

3 Ethics of Euthanasia in pastoral care

and comfort to the people that are about to die. [0]

2The faith of a Christian is relevant to every

aspect of life, and it is said that no individual should cope with the pain in life and suffering

without the ultimate help of God through other people. The duty of the Christians in this [0]

particular extends even to social transformation specifically to reform the structures and

institutions by which health and spiritual care are delivered if the structures impose monetary

burdens on or fail to comfort the people that are about to die adequately. [0]

The sentiments by the Church are encouraging in light of a broader cultural trend towards

viewing euthanasia in a more favorable light. For instance, there was an attempt to emotionally [0]

manipulate theatre goers into believing that doctors assisted suicide choice is the moral choice

for a romantic who used a wheelchair in a movie called that was released in Me Before You

2016. Methodist confronts the fear of the secular culture of death. The Church points out that [0]

every mortal life will undoubtedly end through death and for Christians, death should not be

viewed as a hopeless adventure, but it is the door to a life that opens to eternity. Indeed, that acts [0]

an important reminder that highlights both the need to evangelize the souls that are lost, with the

gospel and share the hope that Christians have in Jesus Christ. The church articulates the [0]

traditional teachings on the dignity of human life and the obligation of people to love one another

and offers hope that in the future the timeless truths will be extended beyond euthanasia to other

pressing social issues in the society.

Positive Aspects of Euthanasia

2 Hopkins, Denise Dombkowski, and Michael Sherwood Koppel. Grounded in the living word: The Old Testament

and pastoral care practices. William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, 2010.

4 Ethics of Euthanasia in pastoral care

The right to die should be an issue of individual choice in that people can decide on all

types of things in life from who they espouse to the type of occupation they undertake and that

must also apply to when one has a terminal illness. Allowing a patient to have access to

physician-assisted suicide enable the sick individual to have control over their condition to end

life ethically and mercifully. It should be noted that assisted suicide does not only denote to the

contribution of a physician. 3To be an assistant to death or suicide of human being is another

matter that is removed from assisted suicide. In assisted physician suicide, the doctor assists.

However, many people have questioned the right of the health society to give this option to the

patients pointing out that it is the job of the doctors to certify that a sick individual lives a full life

with access to all possible available conducts. The challengers of patient assisted suicide believes

that it is not the obligation of the doctors to help the patient die but to assist them to recover or

contribute them to carry on living no matter what their value may be.

4However, the main blemish in this dispute is that it disregards the point that some fatally

ill patients agonize from a great deal of pain and no longer desire to have their lives theatrically

extended by affluent, painful, or deliberating treatments and would instead die gently. For them,

it would be helpful for the health community to provide some perpetual solution to the

discomfort and extended e as they may not wish to commit suicide or worse are in the flesh not lif

capable of doing so. Whereas the medical society have the duty to assist the patients as much as [5]

possible, if there is no hope of recovery on the part of the patient, it should also be their

3 Paterson, Craig. . Routledge, 2017. Assisted suicide and euthanasia: a natural law ethics approach

4 Evans, Abigail Rian. . Wm. Is God still at the bedside?: the medical, ethical, and pastoral issues of death and dying B. Eerdmans Publishing, 2011.

5 Ethics of Euthanasia in pastoral care

obligation to end the pain and grief of the patient if they have demanded it. 5Related to this idea

is that every human being kept alive by machinery ainst an individual’s will seem unpleasant ag

and cold-hearted, specifically if pain appears to be a persistent factor.

Terminally individuals tend to live against their will though unmanageable, and this is ill

a show of cruelty different from the argument of opponents of physician-assisted suicide that

claim that the involvement of the medics in the death of the patients is harsh and brutal. Most

patients that seek suicide that is closely monitored by doctors tend to have illnesses that they

know they will never recover from. A considerable percentage of such patients tend to have

cancer and other common diseases such as heart illnesses, AIDS and nervous ailments such as

motor neuron disease. [2]

Moral Dilemmas of Euthanasia

Euthanasia raises different moral dilemmas such as the right to end the life of a fatally ill

individual who is going through austere pain and misery. And under what situations can [2]

euthanasia be vindicated as well as the moral differences between murdering someone and

letting them die? At the center of the points of view are the diverse philosophies that individuals

tend to have concerning the meaning of and value and the presence of human. 6Some people

think that euthanasia should not be permitted even if it was ethically justifiable since there is a

possibility that it could be -treated and used to cover manslaughter. Euthanasia can be carried ill [1]

5 Savulescu, Julian. “The structure of ethics review: expert ethics committees and the challenge of voluntary

[3] [3] Ethics of Euthanasia in pastoral care

research euthanasia.” 44, no. 7 (2018): 491-Journal of medical ethics 493. [4]

6 McEvoy, Patrick. “Euthanasia, ethics, and the Gordian Knot: is the Hippocratic Code obsolete?.” (2015): 624-625.

[11] [11] [1]

6

out by taking actions plus the giving the lethal injection or by not doing what is essential to keep

an individual alive. Some individuals argue that it is not euthanasia if a patient passes away as a [1]

result of unusual or burdensome treatment. It is not euthanasia when a doctor gives out a drug to [1]

decrease pain even though the drug causes the patient to die faster and that is because the

primary intention of the doctor was to discharge pain and not to kill the patient. [1]

Present Theological Issues

Christians are typically against euthanasia, and the main arguments are frequently based

on the principles that life is a gift given by God and that human beings are made in the image of

God. Some places of worship also reiterate the significance of not tampering with the natural

procedure of demise. Christians consider that the inherent self-respect and value of the lives of

human are all valuable. Christians do not think that the value and human dignity are dignified by

intelligence and dignity or any accomplishments in life. [1] 7However, there are some exemptions

and oversights as some types of Christianity suggests that there are some duties that go against

the overall outlook that euthanasia is a bad thing. Christianity necessitates people to respect their [1]

fellow human beings. If people respect an individual, then they should respect every decision [1]

about the end of life. The society should respect their coherent decision to reject excessively [1]

oppressive conduct even if it may offer several weeks more of life.

7 Keown, John. . Cambridge University Press, Euthanasia, ethics and public policy: an argument against legalisation

[2]  Ethics of Euthanasia in pastoral care

2018.

http://www.plagscan.com/highlight?doc=124761776&source=1&cite=0&hl=textonly#0
http://www.plagscan.com/highlight?doc=124761776&source=1&cite=3&hl=textonly#3
http://www.plagscan.com/highlight?doc=124761776&source=1&cite=1&hl=textonly#1
http://www.plagscan.com/highlight?doc=124761776&source=1&cite=10&hl=textonly#10
http://www.plagscan.com/highlight?doc=124761776&source=1&cite=8&hl=textonly#8
http://www.plagscan.com/highlight?doc=124761776&source=1&cite=5&hl=textonly#5
http://www.plagscan.com/highlight?doc=124761776&source=2&cite=4&hl=textonly#4

7

Bibliography

Cuman, Giulia, and Chris Gastmans. “Minors and euthanasia: a systematic review of argument-

based ethics literature.” 176, no. 7 (2017): 837-847. European journal of pediatrics

Evans, Abigail Rian. Is God still at the bedside?: the medical, ethical, and pastoral issues of

death and dying. Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing, 2011.

Hopkins, Denise Dombkowski, and Michael Sherwood Koppel. Grounded in the living word:

The Old Testament and pastoral care practices. William B. Eerdmans Publishing

Company, 2010.

Keown, John. . Euthanasia, ethics and public policy: an argument against legalisation

Cambridge University Press, 2018.

McEvoy, Patrick. “Euthanasia, ethics, and the Gordian Knot: is the Hippocratic Code obsolete?.”

(2015): 624-625. Ethics of Euthanasia in pastoral care

Paterson, Craig. . Routledge, Assisted suicide and euthanasia: a natural law ethics approach

2017. Ethics of Euthanasia in pastoral care

Savulescu, Julian. “The structure of ethics review: expert ethics committees and the challenge of

voluntary research euthanasia.” 44, no. 7 (2018): 491-493. Journal of medical ethics