Music and Spatial Task Performance Assignment Papers.

Music and Spatial Task Performance Assignment Papers.

Music and Spatial Task Performance Assignment Papers.

Permalink: https://nursingpaperessays.com/music-and-spatia…ssignment-papers/

In the October 14, 1993 issue of Nature magazine, UC Irvine researchers Frances
Rauscher, Gordon Shaw, and Katherine Ky published a short, one-page article entitled ‘Music
and spatial task performance,’ which detailed their research involving exposing college students
to 10 minutes of Mozart’s Sonata for Two Pianos in D Major (K. 448), a relaxation tape, or
silence, followed by a test on spatial reasoning, taken from the Stanford-Binet intelligence test.

 

Their research showed a statistically significant rise in scores from those students who had
listened to the Mozart sonata. The popular response was phenomenal.Music and Spatial Task Performance Assignment Papers.
Newspapers around the country christened their finding ‘the Mozart effect,’ and the
Mozart recording used in the study quickly sold out in the Boston area (Shaw 2000, 5). In
Georgia, Governor Zell Miller became so enthralled at the results of the study that, with
Beethoven’s ‘Ode to Joy’ playing in the background, he called for the legislature to allocate
$105,000 to give a free classical music tape or CD to every new mother in the state (AAAS
1998). Tennessee soon followed suit with a similar bill; Florida now requires day-care centers to
play classical music, and a New York community college now has a ‘Mozart effect study room’
(Gladwell 2000). Classical music radio stations latched on to the idea, one publishing a letter in
its newsletter from a listener who claims that she turned on the station and ‘immediately, my test
scores improved’ (Brin 1998, 11). A cottage industry sprung up, as Don Campbell (a long-time
advocate of music therapy) had the foresight to trademark ‘The Mozart Effect,’ adding fuel to
the fire by publishing a book by that title. The book actually only devotes two and a half pages
3
to the UC Irvine study, the rest of its pages filled with anecdotes, pseudoscience, and conjecture.Music and Spatial Task Performance Assignment Papers.
One chapter even claims that music can alleviate AIDS, allergies, and Diabetes (Campbell 1997,
226-252)! A recent cursory search on Amazon.com turned up half a dozen compact disc titles,
with names like ‘Better Thinking Through Mozart,’ ‘Mozart for Your Mind,’ a whole series of
‘Music for the Mozart Effect,’ and even ‘Ultrasound’Music for the Unborn Child’ (featuring.Music and Spatial Task Performance Assignment Papers. Mozart’s music)

The purpose of the study is to determine whether or not there exists a causal relationship between music and spatial task performance. The research process has been fueled by a gap in previous studies on the same topic that making it necessary to have a further analysis of the topic. Music and Spatial Task Performance Assignment Papers. Music is an integral part of the human beings from their childhood and the research process is concerned with the relationship between music and other forms of human intelligence. The fact that there is scanty evidence on correlations between music cognition and spatial reasoning makes it necessary to conduct this research. The topic of is quite interesting considering the fact that not many people have had the chance to explore the role of music to the cognitive functions of humans. It is worth understanding that music is prevalent in every aspect of human life irrespective of their ages or gender thus necessitating an extensive study on the topic.Music and Spatial Task Performance Assignment Papers.

Every research process is guided by a hypothesis which is a statement that is proved after the research process. In this case, the hypothesis of the study is ‘’ Music which is universally appreciated from birth, can be used to develop inherent firing patterns, along with associated behaviors which are relevant to spatial reasoning. In essence, the researcher intends to prove that there is some sort of relationship between listening music and spatial reasoning amongst persons. The hypothesis wants to expand on previous studies which have indicated that listening to music can lead to short term spatial facilitation. In essence, the researcher propagates that listening to music will certainly lead to spatial facilitation even to the young children whose cortex is not yet mature. Positive results would prove that there is great relationship between music and other human neurons.Music and Spatial Task Performance Assignment Papers.

To prove the hypothesis, the research process adopted use of primary data based on previous studies. The research process intends to collect data from college students and record the effect on them when listening to a Mozart. The college students will also be subjected to highly repetitive music and record on the effect to spatial reasoning.Music and Spatial Task Performance Assignment Papers. Besides using the college students, the research process will also involve infants whose cortex is not yet mature. This is based on the premises that the young ones provide a long term enhancement to nonverbal cognitive abilities as compared to the grown up college students. Use of Stanford-Binet intelligence scale was also embraced in the study to determine the spatial reasoning of different university students after participating in the listening to Mozart and also to a control group that was silent. The different memory levels between the two groups were compared to prove whether there is any relationship between listening to music and spatial reasoning.Music and Spatial Task Performance Assignment Papers.

The research process got varied results. For instance, it was evident that there was a relationship between music and spatial reasoning as evidenced by the results from the silent vs Mozart group. It is evident that the spatial reasoning of Mozart group improved after every day they encounter with Mozart Sonata. Also, the control results where there were silence, mixed and Mozart group, it was evident that the Mozart group enhanced spatial reasoning as opposed to others.Music and Spatial Task Performance Assignment Papers. As the number of days of listening to Mozart increased, the cognitive ability of the respondents increased significantly. The study also proved that minimalist or rhythmically repetitive musical structures do not enhance spatial task performance. The results of the research have also confirmed that early music training enhances spatial task performance as shown by the results from the three year old children. In essence, the results of the research process have proved the hypothesis of the study.Music and Spatial Task Performance Assignment Papers.

For decades there has been research and study, debate and critique, media, marketing, and mystery surrounding one theory: music makes you smarter. It isn’t a new thing for parents to play Mozart’s Piano Sonata No. 10 in C Major for their infant in the hopes that it will somehow increase their chances of becoming a child prodigy, but it has been years since “the Mozart effect” was presented to the public. It was 1993 when Frances H. Rauscher first considered the effects of musical exposure.Music and Spatial Task Performance Assignment Papers. The same year he published an article in Nature entitled “Music and spatial task performance” in which he reported that only ten minutes of listening to a Mozart sonata produced short-term increases in spatial reasoning skills, thus termed “the Mozart effect” (Moreno 2). But Rauscher was only the first and the findings have only multiplied in the last twenty years. Teachers, parents, scientists, psychologists and musicians all over the world having been searching to discover if musical training or expertise truly increases your intelligence, and countless studies have been done in which the link between music and cognition or intelligence is closely examined. While great strides have been made and the findings are of significant value, the problem seems to be finding absolute causality between musical training and increased intelligence.Music and Spatial Task Performance Assignment Papers.

The study that will be replicated is the study done by Nantais and Schellenberg (1999), which was a follow-up study for Rauscher’s experiment (1993, 1995), who’s aim was to conduct a study in which to test whether music and spatial task performance are casually related. The aim of Nantais and Schellenberg’s study was to replicate and extend the basic findings of Rauscher et al which were that participants who listened to Mozart before taking a spatial ability test did better than those who sat in silence, also known as the Mozart effect.Music and Spatial Task Performance Assignment Papers. Nantais and Schellenberg expected that the performance on a spatial-temporal task was better after participants listened to a piece composed by Mozart or by Schubert than after the participants sat in silence. The participants included twenty-eight undergraduates. There were two conditions: the music condition, and the control (story) condition. All twenty-eight participants listened to ten minutes of Mozart’s Sonata for Two Pianos in D Major, K. 448 in the music condition. Control conditions were identical to the music conditions except that during the listening period, participants listened to a ten-minute story called “The Last Rung on the Ladder” (King, 1994). After each condition, the participants took an assessment that tested the participants’ spatial abilities.Music and Spatial Task Performance Assignment Papers.

The study that will be replicated is the study done by Nantais and Schellenberg (1999), which was a follow-up study for Rauscher’s experiment (1993, 1995), who’s aim was to conduct a study in which to test whether music and spatial task performance are casually related. Music and Spatial Task Performance Assignment Papers. The aim of Nantais and Schellenberg’s study was to replicate and extend the basic findings of Rauscher et al which were that participants who listened to Mozart before taking a spatial ability test did better than those who sat in silence, also known as the Mozart effect. Nantais and Schellenberg expected that the performance on a spatial-temporal task was better after participants listened to a piece composed by Mozart or by Schubert than after the participants sat in silence. The participants included twenty-eight undergraduates. There were two conditions: the music condition, and the control (story) condition. All twenty-eight participants listened to ten minutes of Mozart’s Sonata for Two Pianos in D Major, K. 448 in the music condition. Control conditions were identical to the music conditions except that during the listening period, participants listened to a ten-minute story called “The Last Rung on the Ladder” (King, 1994). After each condition, the participants took an assessment that tested the participants’ spatial abilities. After going through both conditions, the participants then said which condition the participants preferred. The results were that the Mozart effect, or the theory that…Music and Spatial Task Performance Assignment Papers.

The study that will be replicated is the study done by Nantais and Schellenberg (1999), which was a follow-up study for Rauscher’s experiment (1993, 1995), who’s aim was to conduct a study in which to test whether music and spatial task performance are casually related.Music and Spatial Task Performance Assignment Papers. The aim of Nantais and Schellenberg’s study was to replicate and extend the basic findings of Rauscher et al which were that participants who listened to Mozart before taking a spatial ability test did better than those who sat in silence, also known as the Mozart effect. Nantais and Schellenberg expected that the performance on a spatial-temporal task was better after participants listened to a piece composed by Mozart or by Schubert than after the participants sat in silence. The participants included twenty-eight undergraduates. There were two conditions: the music condition, and the control (story) condition. All twenty-eight participants listened to ten minutes of Mozart’s Sonata for Two Pianos in D Major, K. 448 in the music condition. Control conditions were identical to the music conditions except that during the listening period, participants listened to a ten-minute story called “The Last Rung on the Ladder” (King, 1994). After each condition, the participants took an assessment that tested the participants’ spatial abilities. After going through both conditions, the participants then said which condition the participants preferred. The results were that the Mozart effect, or the theory that…Music and Spatial Task Performance Assignment Papers.

 

Get a 10 % discount on an order above $ 100
Use the following coupon code :
NURSING10