Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

 Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

 Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

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As a future advanced practice nurse, it is important that you are able to connect your classroom experience to your practicum experience. By applying the concepts you study in the classroom to clinical settings, you enhance your professional competency. Each week, you complete an Assignment that prompts you to reflect on your practicum experiences and relate them to the material presented in the classroom. This week, you begin documenting your practicum experiences in your Practicum Journal. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

Learning Objectives

Students will:

· Analyze nursing and counseling theories to guide practice in psychotherapy*

· Summarize goals and objectives for personal practicum experiences*

· Produce timelines for practicum activities*

In preparation for this course’s practicum experience, address the following in your Practicum Journal:

Select one nursing theory and one counseling theory to best guide your practice in psychotherapy. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

Explain why you selected these theories. Support your approach with evidence-based literature.

Develop at least three goals and at least three objectives for the practicum experience in this course.

Create a timeline of practicum activities based on your practicum requirements.

Required Readings

American Nurses Association. (2014). Psychiatric-mental health nursing: Scope and standards of practice (2nd ed.). Washington, DC: Author. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

· Standard 5A “Coordination of Care” (page 54)

Wheeler, K. (Ed.). (2014). Psychotherapy for the advanced practice psychiatric nurse: A how-to guide for evidence-based practice. New York, NY: Springer.

· Chapter 11, “Group Therapy” (pp. 407–428)

Nichols, M. (2014). The essentials of family therapy (6th ed.). Boston, MA: Pearson.

· Chapter 1, “The Foundations of Family Therapy” (pp. 1–6)

· Chapter 2, “The Evolution of Family Therapy” (pp. 7–28)

Breeskin, J. (2011). Procedures and guidelines for group therapy. The Group Psychologist, 21(1). Retrieved from http://www.apadivisions.org/division-49/publications/newsletter/group-psychologist/2011/04/group-procedures.aspx

Khawaja, I. S., Pollock, K., & Westermeyer, J. J. (2011). The diminishing role of psychiatry in group psychotherapy: A commentary and recommendations for change. Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience, 8(11), 20–23. Retrieved from http://innovationscns.com/

Note: You will access this article from the Walden Library databases.

Koukourikos, K., & Pasmatzi, E. (2014). Group therapy in psychotic inpatients. Health Science Journal, 8(3), 400–408. Retrieved from http://www.hsj.gr/medicine/group-therapy-in-psychotic-inpatients.php?aid=2644

Note: You will access this article from the Walden Library databases. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

Lego, S. (1998). The application of Peplau’s theory to group psychotherapy. Journal of Psychiatric & Mental Health Nursing, 5(3), 193–196. doi:10.1046/j.1365-2850.1998.00129.x

Note: You will access this article from the Walden Library databases.

McClanahan, K. K. (2014). Can confidentiality be maintained in group therapy? Retrieved from http://nationalpsychologist.com/2014/07/can-confidentiality-be-maintained-in-group-therapy/102566.html

U.S. Department of Health & Human Services. (2014). HIPAA privacy rule and sharing information related to mental health. Retrieved from http://www.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/ocr/privacy/hipaa/understanding/special/mhguidancepdf.pdf

Laureate Education (Producer). (2015). Microskills: Family counseling techniques 1 [Video file]. Baltimore, MD: Author.

Note: The approximate length of this media piece is 32 minutes.

Laureate Education (Producer). (2015). Microskills: Family counseling techniques 2 [Video file]. Baltimore, MD: Author.

Note: The approximate length of this media piece is 32 minutes.

Laureate Education (Producer). (2015). Microskills: Family counseling techniques 3 [Video file]. Baltimore, MD: Author.

Note: The approximate length of this media piece is 24 minutes. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

Evaluate psychotherapeutic approaches to group therapy for addiction

To prepare:

· Review this week’s Learning Resources and reflect on the insights they provide on group therapy for addiction.

· View the media, Levy Family: Sessions 1-7, and consider the psychotherapeutic approaches being used.

· Levy Family Episode 1 Program Transcript [MUSIC PLAYING] FEMALE SPEAKER: You’re not dressed? You’re going to be late for work. MALE SPEAKER: I’m not going to work. I’m sick. FEMALE SPEAKER: Of course you’re sick. You’re hungover. I don’t want the boys to see you like this. Go back to bed. MALE SPEAKER: See me like what? I told you, I’m sick. FEMALE SPEAKER: Well, what do you call it when someone is sick almost every morning, because they drink every night while they sit in the dark watching TV? MALE SPEAKER: You calling me a drunk? FEMALE SPEAKER: What do you call it? MALE SPEAKER: I call it, leave me the hell alone. FEMALE SPEAKER: Baby, you need to stop this. It’s tearing us up. The drinking, the anger– you’re depressed. MALE SPEAKER: You said, for better or worse. FEMALE SPEAKER: My vows don’t cover this. You were never like this before. You’ve changed. I want us back, the way we used to be. MALE SPEAKER: That way is dead. It died when I went to Iraq. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

· Levy Family Episode 2 Program Transcript FEMALE SPEAKER: I want to thank you for getting me this Levy case. I think it’s so interesting. Just can’t wait to meet with the client. MALE SPEAKER: What do you find interesting about it? FEMALE SPEAKER: Well, he’s just 31. Usually the vets I work with are older. If they have PTSD, it’s from traumas a long time ago. But Jake, this is all pretty new to him. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers. He just left Iraq a year ago. You know, I was thinking he’d be perfect for one of those newer treatment options, art therapy, meditation, yoga, something like that. MALE SPEAKER: Why? FEMALE SPEAKER: Well, I’ve been dying to try one of them. I’ve read a lot of good things. Why? What are you thinking? MALE SPEAKER: I’m thinking you should really think about it some more. Think about your priorities. It’s a good idea to be open-minded about treatment options, but the needs of the client have to come first, not just some treatment that you or I might be interested in. FEMALE SPEAKER: I mean, I wasn’t saying it like that. I always think of my clients first. MALE SPEAKER: OK. But you mentioned meditation, yoga, art therapy.  Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.Have you seen any research or data that measures how effective they are in treatment? FEMALE SPEAKER: No. MALE SPEAKER: Neither have I. There may be good research out there, and maybe one or two of the treatments that you mentioned might be really good ideas. I just want to point out that you should meet your client first, meet Jake before you make any decisions about how to address his issues. Make sense? Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

· Levy Family Episode 3 Program Transcript JAKE LEVY: We’d be out on recon in our Humvees, and it would get so hot. We used to put our water bottles in wet socks and hang them right outside the window just so the water would cool off of a bit, and maybe then you could drink it. Man, it was cramped in there. You’d be drenched, nowhere to breathe. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers. It’s like riding around in an oven. And you’d have your helmet on you, 100 pounds of gear and ammo. I swear, sometimes I feel like it’s still on me, like it’s all still strapped on me. FEMALE SPEAKER: How many tours did you do in Iraq? JAKE LEVY: Three. After that last recon, I just– There were 26 of us. Five marines in the Humvee I was in. I remember I was wearing my night vision goggles. We passed through a village and everything was green, like I was in a dream or under water. And then there was a flash, bright light just blinded me. There was this explosion. I can’t– I can’t– FEMALE SPEAKER: It’s OK, Jake. Take it easy. I understand this is difficult. There’s something I;d like to try with you. It’s called exposure therapy, and it’s a treatment that’s used a lot with war veterans, especially those struggling with anxiety and PTSD. JAKE LEVY: Exposure therapy? FEMALE SPEAKER: Yes. It’s to help someone like yourself to confront your feelings and anxieties about a traumatic situation that you’ve experienced. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers. It’s a– It’s meant to help you get more control of your thoughts, to make sense of what’s happened, and to not be so afraid of your memories. JAKE LEVY: Put that in a bottle and I’ll buy 10 cases of it. FEMALE SPEAKER: Well, one part of it is learning to control your breathing. And when you practice that, you can learn to manage your anxiety, to get more control of it, not let it control you, to protect yourself. Do you want to try it? JAKE LEVY: Right now? FEMALE SPEAKER: Sure. JAKE LEVY: Why not? Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

· Levy Family Episode 4 Program Transcript FEMALE SPEAKER: So do you want to try to go back to what you’re telling me before? LEVY: I can try. It was night. We were out on patrol. I remember it was so hot packed in our vehicle. Suddenly there was an explosion. We got tossed into a ditch. And somehow I made it out, and I could see it was the Humvee behind us. It’s whole front end was gone. It had hit a roadside bomb. Our vehicle had just driven past it, just mistriggering it. But not them. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers. They didn’t make it. FEMALE SPEAKER: Remember how we practiced. Slow your breathing down. Inhale and exhale from your abdomen. LEVY: Thank you. FEMALE SPEAKER: And just take your time. Whenever you are ready. LEVY: So the bomb went off. I managed to get out. I had my night vision goggles on. And I could see the Humvee, the one that got hit. It’s whole front end was gone. And there’s this crater in the road. And inside it I could see– I could see Kurt’s– our platoon Sergeant, he was lying there everything below his waist was gone, blown off. And he was screaming. Screaming like nothing you’d ever heard. And then he was looking at me. And he was screaming for me to kill him. To stop his suffering. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers. He was yelling, please. Please. And someone tried putting tourniquets on him. But the ground just kept getting darker with his blood. And I was staring into his face. I had my rifle trained on him. I was going to do it. You know. He was begging me to. I could feel my finger on the trigger. And I kept looking into his face. And then I didn’t have to do nothing. Because the screaming had stopped. He’d bled out. Died right there. And all I could think was I’d let him down. His last request, and I couldn’t do it. I couldn’t put a bullet in him so he could die fast not slow. FEMALE SPEAKER: I can see and hear how painful it is for you to relive this story. Thank you for sharing it. Do you think this incident is behind some of the symptoms you’ve been telling me about? LEVY: When I go to sleep at night, I close my eyes, and I see Kurt’s there staring at me. So I don’t sleep too good. That’s why I started drinking. It’s the only way I © 2013 Laureate Education, Inc. 1 Levy Family Episode 4 can forget about that night. So I drink too much. At least that’s what my wife yells at me. We’re not doing too well these days. I’m not exactly the life of the party. I left Iraq 10 months ago. But Iraq never left me. I’m afraid it’s never going to leave me alone. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

· Levy Family Episode 5 Program Transcript FEMALE SPEAKER: It was such an intense story. I just kept seeing things the way he did, you know. The weird green of his night-vision goggles, his sergeant screaming for Jake to kill him. I just keep seeing it all in my head. [MUSIC PLAYING] MALE SPEAKER: Why, do you think? FEMALE SPEAKER: Why what? MALE SPEAKER: Why do you think you keep thinking about this story, this particular case? FEMALE SPEAKER: I don’t know, maybe because it’s so vivid. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers. You know, I went home last night, turned on the TV to try to get my mind off it. And a commercial for the Marines came on, and there was all over again– the explosion, the screams, the man dying. Such a nightmare to live with, and he’s got a baby on they way. MALE SPEAKER: Could that be it, the baby? FEMALE SPEAKER: Maybe. That’s interesting you say that. I mean, the other vets I work with are older, and they have grown kids. But Jake is different. I just keep picturing him with a newborn. And I guess it scares me. I wonder if he Levy Family Episode 6 Program Transcript FEMALE SPEAKER: I know three of you did tours of duty in Iraq, and the others in Afghanistan. So I just wanted to follow up on that, talk about how you’re adjusting. [MUSIC PLAYING] MALE SPEAKER 1: You say adjust to, but there’s no adjustment. You’re just thrown back into your life like you’re supposed to pick up where you left off, but that’s a joke. Two years ago, I was dug in, pinned down by 50 Cal sniper fire, just praying the chopper would get me out alive. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers. Now, the hardest part of my day is standing in the grocery store trying to decide if I want yellow or brown mustard with my hot dogs. JAKE: Nah, two six packs or a case. FEMALE SPEAKER: You find that you drink more than you used to? JAKE: Why not ask him if he finds he’s eating more hot dogs than he used to? BILL: You know why? JAKE: Why is that? Oh great, Buddha. BILL: Because I’ve been where you are. You talk about booze like it’s some joke, but nobody’s laughing. You can’t get adjusted to anything when you’re trying to get loaded. JAKE: I guess you won’t be joining me for a drink at the bar later. I was going to buy. FEMALE SPEAKER: No, that’s a good point, Bill. Sometimes we do things to avoid dealing with unpleasant feelings, like adjusting to life back at home. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers. JAKE: What do you know about it? Give me a break. Back off, or I’ll make you. BILL: I drink too much too. But I’ve had enough of you mouthing off. JAKE: My wife’s had enough of me too. She’s the reason I’m here. We never used to fight. I never used to drink so much, but now I can’t stop myself from doing either. FEMALE SPEAKER: So why do you drink too much? © 2017 Laureate Education, Inc. 1 Levy Family Episode 6 BILL: It’s the only way I can shut it out, images of what I saw over there, horrible things that no one should ever have to see. I wake up some nights and I hear mortar rounds coming in. And I reach for my helmet and my weapon, but they’re not there. So I freak out. And then I see pretty curtains. TV’S on. And then I remember I’m at home. I realize I’m not going to get blown up after all. FEMALE SPEAKER: Thanks for sharing, Jake. You make a good point. It can seem a lot easier to self medicate rather than face the fears, the bad memories that we have. So what do you think? What are some other things, maybe, you do to avoid the challenge to being a civilian again?’ll be able to deal with it. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

· Levy Family Episode 7 Program Transcript FEMALE SPEAKER: How did you find out? MALE SPEAKER: There’s a guy who served in our platoon. He didn’t call. Wrote an email. He said it would bother him too much if he talked about it. Sorry to be the one who tells you that Eric committed suicide last night. The last time I saw him, he said he was adjusting to civilian life pretty well. His girlfriend told me it wasn’t true. She said he told everyone he was doing fine. But the nightmares kept after him even when he wasn’t sleeping. It just tore him up. I guess he decided he’d had enough. He ended it with a service revolver. Marine to the end. FEMALE SPEAKER: I’m sorry, Jake. MALE SPEAKER: Thank you. You know, I spend almost every night in front of the TV, drinking until I can’t remember anything else.  Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.But I read that email last night, and I didn’t drink a drop. I just kept thinking about Eric. You know we went through Parris Island together? FEMALE SPEAKER: I didn’t know that. MALE SPEAKER: Yeah. I didn’t turn on the TV, either. I went straight to the computer. And before I knew it, I was reading about veterans and suicide. They say about 22 veterans commit suicide every day, 22. That’s like one every hour. Makes it sound like we’re time bombs. Makes you wonder which one of us is going to go off next. FEMALE SPEAKER: You sound glad that you didn’t drink last night. MALE SPEAKER: Yeah. I’ve been trying to quit for my wife. But that email– you know what else I read online? I checked all over with the VA, but it doesn’t look like they do anything to help prevent suicide. I mean, they offer help if you ask for it, but no prevention. Who’s going to ask for help, right? They train you to be stronger than everyone else, to endure. Asking for help is just not something most men do. FEMALE SPEAKER: Do you need help, Jake? MALE SPEAKER: I need a lot, but not like that. I’m not ready to check out yet. I got a baby on the way. © 2017 Laureate Education, Inc. 1 Levy Family Episode 7 I found out something else. I was reading about this veteran who committed suicide in another state. And they started this program in his memory that brings other vets together to help each other. FEMALE SPEAKER: Peer counseling? MALE SPEAKER: Yeah, that’s it. And I spent the whole rest of the night thinking, why don’t we have something like that? We should be reaching out to all vets, not just those who are already getting mental health services. I’d even volunteer to get something like that going. FEMALE SPEAKER: Well, that’s a great idea. But we’d need to find the money for a program like that. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers. I mean, our budget is maxed out. We’d have to lobby the state legislature for the funding. MALE SPEAKER: Well, I’ll do it. I’ll write the letter. I want to try. FEMALE SPEAKER: Well, OK. MALE SPEAKER: I can’t let Eric go without doing something for him. For me, too

The Assignment

In a 2- to 3-page paper, address the following:

Identify the psychotherapeutic approach that the group facilitator is using, and explain why she might be using this approach.

Determine whether or not you would use the same psychotherapeutic approach if you were the counselor facilitating this group, and justify your decision. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

Identify an alternative approach to group therapy for addiction, and explain why it is an appropriate option. Support your position with evidence-based literature. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

Required Readings

American Nurses Association. (2014). Psychiatric-mental health nursing: Scope and standards of practice (2nd ed.). Washington, DC: Author.

· Standard 6 “Evaluation” (pages 65-66)

Wheeler, K. (Ed.). (2014). Psychotherapy for the advanced practice psychiatric nurse: A how-to guide for evidence-based practice. New York, NY: Springer. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

· Chapter 16, “Psychotherapeutic Approaches for Addictions and Related Disorders” (pp. 565–596)

Yalom, I. D., & Leszcz, M. (2005). The theory and practice of group psychotherapy (5th ed.). New York, NY: Basic Books.

· Chapter 13, “Problem Group Members” (pp. 391–427)

American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (5th ed.). Washington, DC: Author.

Note: Retrieved from Walden Library databases.

Gamble, J., & O’ Lawrence, H. (2016). An overview of the efficacy of the 12-step group therapy for substance abuse treatment. Journal of Health & Human Services Administration, 39(1), 142–160. Retrieved from http://jhhsa.spaef.org/

Note: Retrieved from Walden Library databases.

Kim, J. W., Choi, Y. S., Shin, K. C., Kim, O. H., Lee, D. Y., Jung, M. H., … Choi, I. (2012). The effectiveness of continuing group psychotherapy for outpatients with alcohol dependence: 77-month outcomes. Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research, 36(4), 686–692. doi:10.1111/j.1530-0277.2011.01643.x

Note: Retrieved from Walden Library databases.

Allyn & Bacon (Producer). (2000). Motivational interviewing [Video file]. Mill Valley, CA: Psychotherapy.net.

Note: You will access this media from the Walden Library databases. The approximate length of this media piece is 102 minutes. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

Laureate Education (Producer). (2013d). Levy family: Sessions 1-7 [Video file]. Baltimore, MD; Author.

Psychotherapy.net (Producer). (2015). Group therapy for addictions: An interpersonal relapse prevention approach [Video file]. Mill Valley, CA: Author. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

Week 6: Foundations of Group Work and Types of Groups

Evaluate the following group therapy article below. (See attached article)

Bélanger, C., Laporte, L., Sabourin, S., & Wright, J. (2015). The effect of cognitive-behavioral group marital therapy on marital happiness and problem solving self-appraisal. American Journal of Family Therapy, 43(2), 103–118. doi:10.1080/01926187.2014.956614

Applying Current Literature to Clinical Practice

The Assignment

In a 5- to 10-slide PowerPoint presentation, address the following:

· Provide an overview of the article you selected, including answers to the following questions:

· What type of group was discussed?

· Who were the participants in the group? Why were they selected?

· What was the setting of the group?

· How often did the group meet?

· What was the duration of the group therapy?

· What curative factors might be important for this group and why?

· What “exclusion criteria” did the authors mention?

· Explain the findings/outcomes of the study in the article. Include whether this will translate into practice with your own client groups. If so, how? If not, why?

· Explain whether the limitations of the study might impact your ability to use the findings/outcomes presented in the article. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

Note: The presentation should be 5–10 slides , not including the title and reference slides . Include presenter notes (no more than a half page per slide) and use tables and/or diagrams where appropriate. Be sure to support your work with specific citations from the article you selected. Support your presentation with evidence-based literature. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

Required Readings

Wheeler, K. (Ed.). (2014). Psychotherapy for the advanced practice psychiatric nurse: A how-to guide for evidence-based practice. New York, NY: Springer.

· Chapter 11, “Group Therapy” (Review pp. 407–428.)

Yalom, I. D., & Leszcz, M. (2005). The theory and practice of group psychotherapy (5th ed.). New York, NY: Basic Books.

· Chapter 1, “The Therapeutic Factors” (pp. 1–18)

Yalom, I. D., & Leszcz, M. (2005). The theory and practice of group psychotherapy (5th ed.). New York, NY: Basic Books.

· Chapter 2, “Interpersonal Learning” (pp. 19–52)

Yalom, I. D., & Leszcz, M. (2005). The theory and practice of group psychotherapy (5th ed.). New York, NY: Basic Books. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

· Chapter 3, “Group Cohesiveness” (pp. 53–76)

Leszcz, M., & Kobos, J. C. (2008). Evidence-based group psychotherapy: Using AGPA’s practice guidelines to enhance clinical effectiveness. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 64(11), 1238–1260. doi:10.1002/jclp.20531

Note: Retrieved from Walden Library databases.

Marmarosh, C. L. (2014). Empirical research on attachment in group psychotherapy: Moving the field forward. Psychotherapy, 51(1), 88–92. doi:10.1037/a0032523

Note: Retrieved from Walden Library databases.

Microsoft. (2017). Basic tasks for creating a PowerPoint presentation. Retrieved from https://support.office.com/en-us/article/Basic-tasks-for-creating-a-PowerPoint-2013-presentation-efbbc1cd-c5f1-4264-b48e-c8a7b0334e36

Tasca, G. A. (2014). Attachment and group psychotherapy: Introduction to a special section. Psychotherapy, 51(1), 53–56. doi:10.1037/a0033015

Note: Retrieved from Walden Library databases.

Tasca, G. A., Francis, K., & Balfour, L. (2014). Group psychotherapy levels of interventions: A clinical process commentary. Psychotherapy, 51(1), 25–29. doi:10.1037/a0032520

The American Journal of Family Therapy, 43:103–118, 2015 Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC ISSN: 0192-6187 print / 1521-0383 online DOI: 10.1080/01926187.2014.956614

The Effect of Cognitive-Behavioral Group Marital Therapy on Marital Happiness

and Problem Solving Self-Appraisal

CLAUDE BÉLANGER University of Quebec in Montreal (UQAM), Montreal, Canada,

McGill University, Montreal, Canada, and The Interdisciplinary Research Centre on Intimate Relationship Problems and Sexual Abuse

(CRIPCAS), Montreal, Canada

LISE LAPORTE McGill University Health Center, Montreal, Canada

STÉPHANE SABOURIN The Interdisciplinary Research Centre on Intimate Relationship Problems and Sexual Abuse

(CRIPCAS), Montreal, Canada, and Laval University, Quebec City, Canada

JOHN WRIGHT The Interdisciplinary Research Centre on Intimate Relationship Problems and Sexual Abuse

(CRIPCAS), Montreal, Canada

Problem solving self-appraisal affects problem solving performance and marital adjustment. This study investigated the effects of cognitive-behavioral group marital therapy on couples’ adjustment and their self-appraisal of problem solving activities. Sixty-six cou- ples participated in group couples therapy. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers. Subjects were randomly assigned to an experimental or a waiting list control group. They completed the Problem Solving Inventory and the Marital Happiness Scale. Therapy was effective in improving global couple adjustment and problem solving self-appraisal. The program had a differential effect on the improvement of self-perceived problem solving abili- ties depending on the spouses’ initial self-appraised problem solving ability level. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

Address correspondence to Claude Bélanger, Département de Psychologie, Université du Québec à Montréal, C.P. 8888 succursale Centre-ville, Montréal, QC H3C 3P8, Canada. E-mail: belanger.claude@uqam.ca

103

104 C. Bélanger et al.

Marital therapy based on social learning principles aims to enhance com- munication and/or to teach problem solving skills, with the expectation that such behavioral changes will lead to an increase in marital satisfaction (Woodin, 2001). However, increased attention has been devoted to the role of individual cognitive variables in mediating the relationship between communication/problem solving behaviors and marital distress (Bélanger, Sabourin & El-Baalbaki, 2012). The importance of cognitive processes in the development and maintenance of marital dysfunction has been confirmed in several investigations of the implications of spouses’ cognitions in outcome research (Dunn & Schwebel, 1995). Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

Researchers have evaluated problem solving self-appraisal as a deter- minant of individuals’ adaptational outcomes (Godshall and Elliott, 1997; Heppner, Kampa, & Brunning, 1987). Problem solving self-appraisal refers to a relatively stable attitude toward one’s personal problem solving reper- toire as well as toward the self-regulatory processes at work while a problem is being solved (Heppner & Krauskopf, 1987). Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

Social problem solving abilities are used in social contexts, and they af- fect interpersonal adjustment (Elliott & Grant, 2008). For instance, family care- givers demonstrating effective problem solving styles reported greater rela- tionship satisfaction (Shanmugham, Cano, Elliott & Davis, 2009). Self-efficacy in response to personal problems is related to the way the person appraises his or her problem solving skills. Accordingly, to develop good coping ca- pacities, it is important for a person to be able to appraise his or her problem solving skills and style (Heppner & Dong-Gwi, 2009). Moreover, Bandura’s work strongly supports the notion that people’s perception of self-efficacy af- fects their motivation to face challenges, their decision-making behaviors and their emotional reactions in difficult situations (Bandura, 1986; Carré, 2004). Perceived self-efficacy has also been related to many personal difficulties such as depression (Dreer, Elliott, Fletcher, & Swanson, 2005; Rivera et al., 2007; Nezu, Kalmar, Ronan & Clavijo,1986), psychosocial impairment (Shan- mugham, Elliott & Palmatier, 2004) and alcoholism (Elliott, Grant & Miller, 2004); it has also been associated with psychological adjustment (Heppner & Anderson, 1985), physical health (Heppner, Kampa, & Brunning, 1987) and personality (D’Zurilla, Maydeu-Olivares & Gallardo-Pujol, 2011). Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

The well-established links between problem solving self-appraisal and relationship satisfaction have led researchers to investigate problem solving capacities and self-appraisal in relation to coping skills and the marital relationship. These studies were based on the basic premise that, for most people, the quality of their marital relationship is an important predictor of their general well-being (Hertzog, 2011). When facing stressful life events, partners use joint efforts in problem solving interactions and other coping strategies to reestablish satisfaction and maintain marital adjustment. A failure in these cognitive and behavioral adaptation mechanisms often leads to marital distress. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

Impact of Group CBT on Marital Happiness and Self-Appraisal 105

Dyadic coping strategies encompass both the cognitive and behavioral components that influence marital satisfaction. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the relationships between the cognitive strategies and so- cial behaviors that partners adopt during their problem solving interactions. If there is such a link, then what is the exact nature of this interrelation, and in what ways do these cognitive (problem solving self-appraisal) and behavioral (problem solving efficacy) strategies influence marital satisfac- tion? The preoccupation with understanding the cognitive and behavioral problem solving determinants of marital adjustment can be found in a lim- ited number of studies that have addressed these particular issues (Baucom & Kerig, 2004). In line with these questions, an investigation in our lab- oratory showed that problem solving self-appraisal differentiates distressed from non-distressed partners (Sabourin, Laporte, & Wright, 1990).  Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.Distressed spouses expressed less problem solving confidence, a stronger tendency to avoid different problem solving activities, and less control over their behav- ior than their non-distressed partners (Sabourin et al., 1990). Another study that was run by the same team (Lussier et al., 1997) examined the rela- tionship between spouses’ attachment styles, coping strategies, and marital satisfaction. These researchers pinpointed many links between attachment strategies, coping skills and marital adjustment. These results are consistent with Bodenmann et al. (2006), who reported several studies showing that positive dyadic coping significantly correlates with a better quality of mari- tal relationship, lower levels of stress and better physical and psychological well-being, and in some studies, these correlations are stronger for women than for men. Kurdek (1991) tried to conceptualize these variables into a model in which he assessed the role of cognitively and behaviorally ori- ented problem solving determinants on the relationship satisfaction of gay and lesbian partners. His results support a problem solving model in which relationship satisfaction is related to strategies used by partners to resolve their conflicts. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

In a recent study, Bélanger and his colleagues (2012) investigated the mutual contributions of a self-reported cognitive strategy, coping, observed problem solving behaviors, and marital adjustment. In line with Kurdek (1991), they hypothesized that the specific coping strategies would be re- lated to the quality of the problem solving behaviors and that both these variables would be related to marital satisfaction. Their results propose that, for both men and women, there are significant relationships between cog- nitive and coping strategies, problem solving behaviors displayed during marital interactions, and marital adjustment. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

Thus, because empirical studies have demonstrated that problem solving self-appraisal is directly related to problem solving performance (Heppner & Dong-Gwi, 2009), spouses should not only possess the problem solving skills necessary to confront and alleviate their marital difficulties but also believe in their capacity to do so. To be of maximum value, marital therapy

106 C. Bélanger et al.

should therefore not only aim to enhance specific problem solving skills but also should work to alter spouses’ appraisal of their problem solving abilities. To the best of our knowledge, very few outcome studies have investigated such an effect of couples’ cognitive-behavioral therapy on the partners’ self- appraisal of their problem solving abilities and marital satisfaction. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

Accordingly, the main purpose of this paper is 1) to evaluate the overall effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral group marital therapy in bringing about positive changes in marital satisfaction and 2) to study the effects of such a program on partners’ self-appraisal of problem solving abilities.

The specific hypotheses were that group marital therapy subjects would report changes in a) their marital satisfaction; b) the overall appraisal of their problem solving abilities; c) their problem solving confidence; d) their approach to problem solving activities; and e) their strategies to control their behavior when they try to solve a problem. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

The second purpose of this study is to examine the differential effects of cognitive behavioral group marital therapy on appraisal from spouses as being effective or ineffective problem solvers (Nezu, 1985).

It was hypothesized that, following the program, partners who initially appraised their problem solving as ineffective and who believed that they had problem solving deficits would report more changes in their marital adjustment level (Marital Happiness Scale) and in their problem solving skills (Problem Solving Inventory) than subjects who initially appraised themselves as effective problem solvers. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

METHOD

Subjects

Sixty-six French-Canadian couples participated in the study. The subjects had been living together an average of 12.8 years (SD = 8.7 years, range 1 to 31 years), and their age ranged from 20 to 76 years (M = 38.2 years, SD = 1.7 years). The mean number of children for the sample was 1.2 (88% of the couples had children). The average education level was 14.5 years (SD = 2.9 years) for women and 15.7 years (SD = 3.7 years) for men. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

Procedure

Subjects were recruited through publicity in various media. Couples who expressed interest were briefly informed of the nature of the program and invited to an assessment interview. To be selected, couples had to be living together, free of any important individual psychopathology, free of drug or alcohol problems, free of primary sexual dysfunctions, not in intense marital crisis (no pending divorce or physical abuse) and not currently following another therapy. During the assessment interview, all couples completed a battery of questionnaires that included a demographic questionnaire, the

Impact of Group CBT on Marital Happiness and Self-Appraisal 107

Problem Solving Inventory (Heppner & Petersen, 1982), and the Marital Happiness Scale (Azrin, Naster, & Jones, 1973). Partners completed the ques- tionnaires independently. A research assistant remained in the same room as the couple during the task and was available to help participants. Subjects were ensured of the confidentiality of their responses. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

Couples were randomly assigned to the experimental group (n = 30 cou- ples) or to the control group waiting list (n = 36 couples). After completing the program, all couples were administered the same self-report measures. Couples on the waiting list then received the same assessment and treatment procedures.

Treatment

The Couples Survival Program is a group marital therapy program based on a cognitive-behavioral approach to solving marital difficulties designed by researchers in our laboratory (Wright, 1986). Couples are taught skills focused on effective communication, problem solving, exchange of positive experiences and anger expression. The cognitive and behavioral compo- nents of problem solving skills were taught for two sessions (6 hours) in which couples learned different problem solving stages through reading, in- structions, modeling rehearsal, dyadic practices, feedback, cognitive restruc- turing, group discussions, and homework assignments (Dattilio & Epstein, 2005) Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

Each group comprised four couples. They met once a week, for nine consecutive weeks, in three hour sessions. Each group was led by a licensed psychologist with a minimum of two-years experience in marital therapy and group intervention. The co-therapist had at least a master’s degree in clinical or counseling psychology. All group leaders received 30 hours of training and weekly supervision between sessions. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

Measures

The Problem Solving Inventory (PSI; Heppner & Petersen, 1982) is a 32- item measure that evaluates perceptions of personal problem solving behav- iors and attitudes. It yields an overall score as well as three factor scores: problem solving confidence (11 items), approach-avoidance style (16 items), and personal control (5 items). High scores indicate that the subject per- ceives himself/herself as having ineffective problem solving abilities and thus has little problem solving confidence, tendencies to avoid different problem solving activities, and a lack of personal control. Reliability estimates (alpha ranges from .72 to .85) are adequate, and acceptable validity coefficients have been reported in several investigations (Heppner & Anderson, 1985; Nezu &

108 C. Bélanger et al.

Ronan, 1988; Tracey, Sherry, & Keitel, 1986). Moreover, PSI scores have been found to correlate significantly with observational ratings of problem solving competence (Heppner et al, 1982). The French version of the PSI (Laporte, Sabourin, & Wright, 1989) has demonstrated equally sound psychometric properties (alpha ranges from .65 to .86). Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

The Marital Happiness Scale (Azrin, Naster, & Jones, 1973) is a self-report questionnaire that allows the subject to rate his satisfaction on nine aspects of his marital life (household responsibilities, money management, etc.) and to give an overall assessment of his happiness within the relationship. The scores range from 1 to 10, with a higher score indicating a higher level of marital happiness. The instrument possesses good reliability and discriminant validity. The Marital Happiness Scale has been found to be highly correlated (.85) with the Locke-Wallace Marital Adjustment Test (Locke & Wallace, 1973), and inter-item correlations (p < .05 for all correlations) suggest the presence of an underlying single dimension (Libman, Takefman, & Brender, 1980). The French version of the questionnaire has been demonstrated to have equally sound psychometric qualities (alpha ranges from .71 to .80) (Bourgeois, Sabourin, & Wright, 1990). Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

Pre-Treatment Equivalence

Independent t-tests were conducted to determine if there were any sig- nificant differences between the experimental and control groups in terms of sociodemographic variables. The results indicated that the experimental group participants were significantly younger (t (137) = –2.38, p < .02), had more children (t (130) = 6.02, p < .0001) and had been living together for a shorter period (t (125) = –5.09, p < .0001) than their control group counterparts. There were no significant differences between the two groups in terms of income or educational level.

Data showed that a randomization of couples to groups at the onset of the treatment did not produce optimal matching of sociodemographic variables such as age, children and length of relationship. However, Pear- son product-moment correlation coefficients established that the correlations between those variables and the scores on the dependent variables under investigation were very low. There were no significant correlations between socioeconomic variables and problem solving self-appraisal scores (range from .01 to .20), and there was a small relationship between the Marital Happiness Scale’s scores and the ages of the men (p < .02). A two-way analysis of variance was performed on the pretest scores of the experimen- tal and the control groups to determine if there were any initial differences between the groups in the self-appraisal of problem solving abilities and marital adjustment prior to the program. The results indicated that there were no significant differences between the two groups in problem solving

Impact of Group CBT on Marital Happiness and Self-Appraisal 109

TABLE 1 Means and Standard Deviations of Pretest and Posttest for the Experimental and the Control Group

Male Female

Group Experimental Control Experimental Control

Time T1 T2 T1 T2 T1 T2 T1 T2

PSI total M 91.3 77.0 86.9 80.9 94.8 82.1 102.5 97.1 SD 23.8 18.5 28.9 26.8 20.7 17.1 21.7 24.8

PSI M 24.7 23.0 26.0 23.5 27.0 22.9 29.0 28.2 Confidence SD 8.9 7.1 10.3 9.1 7.5 6.6 9.5 10.6 PSI M 49.4 39.1 44.1 42.4 48.5 42.5 52.7 50.4 Approach SD 15.1 9.3 15.5 15.2 13.5 10.2 11.9 13.0 PSI M 17.2 15.0 16.7 14.9 19.4 16.6 21.0 18.5 Control SD 5.6 4.3 6.6 5.2 4.3 3.9 4.3 4.4 Marital M 6.3 7.3 6.3 6.6 6.2 6.9 5.9 6.3 Happiness SD 1.3 1.1 1.1 1.4 1.3 1.2 1.5 1.6

Note. M = mean; SD = standard deviation; PSI = Problem Solving Inventory.

self-appraisal (F(3,60) = 0.8, p <.5) or marital adjustment (F(1, 63) = 2.2, p < 0.14).

Effectiveness of the Program

To determine the effect of treatment and sex on problem solving self- appraisal and marital satisfaction, three series of analysis of variance were performed. The means and standard deviations for the men and women of the experimental and the control groups are presented in Table 1. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

MARITAL HAPPINESS SCALE

A 2 (male vs. female) × 2 (pre vs. post) × 2 (experimental vs. control) analysis of variance (ANOVA) was conducted on this scale using sex as a repeated measure because of the interdependence of husbands’ and wives’ scores (Kenny & Cook, 1999). The results indicated a significant main effect for Time (F(1, 63) = 26.2, p <.01), which was qualified by a significant Group × Time interaction effect (F(1,63) = 4.1, p < .05). There was no significant Group × Time × Sex interaction effect. The mean scores revealed that cou- ples from the experimental group had significantly higher marital adjustment following the program than couples on the waiting list (see Table 1).

PROBLEM SOLVING SELF-APPRAISAL

First, an ANOVA was conducted on the overall score of the PSI. The results revealed a significant effect for Time (F(1,64) = 21.8, p < .0001), which

110 C. Bélanger et al.

TABLE 2 Means and Standard Deviations of Pre-Waiting Period, Post-Waiting Period, and Post Program for the Subjects of the Control Group

Male Female

Moment T1 T2 T3 T1 T2 T3

PSI total score 86.5 81.2 71.4 102.9 96.8 84.3 SD 30.0 27.7 22.4 22.6 24.7 25.5 PSI Confidence 25.8 23.8 21.9 29.2 28.3 25.6 SD 10.4 9.3 9.6 9.7 10.8 8.9 PSI Approach 44.2 42.4 37.1 52.9 50.0 42.4 SD 16.0 15.6 11.8 12.4 12.9 13.5 PSI Control 16.5 15.0 12.4 20.8 18.5 16.3 SD 6.8 5.4 4.9 4.4 4.5 5.0 Marital Happiness 6.3 6.5 7.4 5.9 6.2 7.0 SD 1.3 1.3 1.2 1.6 1.5 1.6

Note. T1 = pre-waiting; T2 = post-waiting; T3 = post-treatment; SD = standard deviation; PSI = Problem Solving Inventory.

was qualified by a significant Group × Time effect (F(1,64) = 3.9, p < .05). The Group × Time × Sex interaction effect was not significant. Couples who participated in the program generally appraised themselves as more effective problem solvers than couples who were on the waiting list. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

To further explore the nature of treatment gains, a two-way MANOVA was conducted on the three problem solving subscale scores. The results in- dicated a significant main effect for Time (F(3, 62) = 11.16, p< .0001), which was qualified by a significant Group × Time interaction effect (F(3, 62) = 3.11, p < .03). The Group × Time × Sex interaction effect was not signifi- cant. Subsequent ANOVAs revealed that, compared to subjects on the waiting list, spouses who followed the group marital therapy reported a significantly stronger tendency to approach diverse problem solving activities (F(1, 64) = 7.2, p < .009). However, they did not rate themselves as approaching prob- lem solving activities more readily or as having more personal control than the subjects who did not received treatment (see Table 1). Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

Quasi Replication Analysis

The effect of the program on couples on the waiting list provided an own- control analysis and represented a partial replication of the study. ANOVAs with repeated measures were performed on the data with pre-waiting scores, post-waiting scores and post-treatment scores as the 3 time points. Table 2 summarizes the means and standard deviations for all measures.

The 3 (pre-waiting vs. post-waiting vs. post-program) × 2 (male vs. fe- male) analysis of variance showed a significant main effect of Time for the Marital Happiness Scale (F(2, 31) = 23, p < .0001), for the overall score of the Problem Solving Inventory (F(2, 31) = 16, p < .0001), and for all

Impact of Group CBT on Marital Happiness and Self-Appraisal 111

PSI subscales (F(6, 26) = 9, p < .0001). The Time × Sex interaction ef- fect was not significant. To determine the source of these differences, two series of analyses of variance were conducted. The first analyses assessed the changes from the pre-waiting to the post-waiting period, whereas the second provided the evaluation of the effect of the program (post-waiting to post-program). Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

The results of the first series of analyses of variance (pre- to post- waiting) indicated a significant Time effect for marital adjustment (F(1.34) = 7.5, p < .01) and for overall PSI score (F(1, 35) = 8.1, p < .007). At the second evaluation, waiting list subjects reported a slight increase in mari- tal adjustment and in the appraisal of their problem solving abilities. The MANOVA conducted on the PSI subscale scores revealed another significant Time effect (F(4, 31) = 3.6, p < .02). Subsequent analyses revealed that subjects reported a significant increase in their problem solving confidence (F(1, 34) = 11.7, p < .002) following the waiting period (see Table 2). Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

The second series of analyses, which evaluated the effect of the treat- ment, demonstrated a significant Time effect for marital adjustment (F(1, 32) = 26.2, p < .0001) and for PSI total score (F(1, 32) = 14.5, p < .001). MANOVAs conducted on the PSI subscales revealed another significant Time effect (F(429) = 9.6, p < .001). Univariate analyses demonstrated substantial changes following the program on all subscales: problem solving confidence (F(1.32) = 5.2, p < .03), approach to problem solving activities (F(1, 32) = 15.5, p < .0001) and strategies to control their behaviors (F(1, 32) = 2.62, p < .02). As shown in Table 2, score increments recorded by the group follow- ing the program were consistently superior to those reported by the same group during the control period. The data confirm that participation in the group marital therapy increased marital adjustment and enhanced spouses’ self-perceived problem solving efficacy. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

Differential Effectiveness of the Program

To investigate the effects of group marital therapy on spouses who appraise their problem solving as either effective or ineffective, three 2 (PSI: effective vs. ineffective) × 2 (pre vs. post) analyses of variance were conducted on the Marital Happiness Scale and on the Problem Solving Inventory (total score and subscales). Because the analyses require a within-group comparison, experimental and control group data were combined to examine the changes from pre- to post-program. Because men and women’s Problem Solving scores had different distributions (respectively, 33 to 161 and 47 to 154), and because they differed significantly from one another (F(1, 61) = 9.8, p < .003), analyses were conducted separately for the sexes using the split half overall PSI score of both groups (men = 83 and women = 94) to subdivide them into effective and ineffective PSI scorers. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

112 C. Bélanger et al.

TABLE 3 Means and Standard Deviations of Pre-Program and Post-Program for Effective and Ineffective Scorers

Male Female

Group Ineffective Effective Ineffective Effective

Time pre post pre post pre post pre post

PSI total M 104.3 81.5 64.5 65.4 112.6 92.4 77.5 73.1 SD 20.0 21.3 12.6 16.2 16.9 23.7 10.8 13.7

PSI M 28.7 23.9 18.9 20.6 33.6 27.1 21.2 21.4 Confidence SD 9.1 8.8 5.5 7.9 8.6 9.3 4.5 4.7 PSI M 56.7 42.6 32.9 32.7 58.5 47.7 39.2 36.6 Approach SD 12.3 10.4 6.7 8.3 9.4 12.8 8.0 7.5 PSI M 18.9 15.0 12.7 12.0 20.5 17.7 17.1 15.1 Control SD 5.1 5.1 4.1 3.8 12.8 4.4 4.0 4.2 Marital M 6.2 7.3 6.6 7.4 5.9 6.7 6.5 7.1 Happiness SD 1.3 1.3 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.3 1.2

Note. M = mean; SD = standard deviation; PSI = Problem Solving Inventory.

MARITAL HAPPINESS SCALE

The results indicated an absence of a significant difference between the effective and ineffective scorers on the Marital Happiness scale (respectively, for men and women, F(1, 61) = .66, p < .3); F(1, 61) = .38, p < .5)). The mean scores revealed that both groups of men and women (effective and ineffective scorers) reported similar improvement in their marital satisfaction following the program (see Table 3). Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

PROBLEM SOLVING INVENTORY

Analyses of the Problem Solving Inventory total scores revealed a significant PSI Group × Time effect for men (F(1, 61) = 18.55, p < .0001) and women (F(1, 61) = 11.05, p < .001). Following the program, women who initially perceived themselves as ineffective problem solvers reported more changes in the overall appraisal of their problem solving abilities than women who, before the program, perceived themselves as effective problem solvers. Sim- ilarly, men who initially appraised themselves as ineffective problem solvers reported more improvements in their overall PSI score following the program than men who initially perceived themselves as effective problem solvers (see Table 3). Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

The results of the MANOVAs conducted on the Problem Solving Inven- tory subscales revealed a significant PSI Group × Time effect (F(3, 59) = 6.26, p < .001) for women and for men (F(3, 59) = 6.2, p < .001). Univari- ate analyses of variance conducted on the group of women indicated that, following the program, women who initially appraised themselves as inef- fective problem solvers noted more improvement in their problem solving

Impact of Group CBT on Marital Happiness and Self-Appraisal 113

confidence (F(1, 37) = 9.3, p < .004) and in their approach to problem solv- ing activities (F(1, 37) = 8.03, p < .007) than women who initially appraised themselves as effective problem solvers. The two groups of women (effective and ineffective) did not differ, however, in their perceived personal control following the treatment (see Table 3). Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

As for the men, subsequent univariate analyses indicated that only the ineffective problem solvers reported improvement in their problem solving confidence (F(1, 61) = 10.5, p < .002), in their approach to problem solving activities (F(1, 61) = 18.4, p < .0001) and in their personal control (F(1, 61) = 9.4, p < .004) following the program (see Table 3). Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

DISCUSSION

The results of this study generally support the hypothesis that couples’ marital happiness increases significantly following participation in cognitive- behavioral group marital therapy (Baucom, Epstein, Kirby & LaTaillade, 2010; Butler, Chapman, Forman, & Beck, 2006). Furthermore, the program was shown to significantly alter spouses’ appraisal of their problem solving effi- cacy. More specifically, the results indicated that, following the intervention, partners reported a significant improvement in their capacity to confront dif- ferent problem solving activities. Moreover, in the analyses that measured their perception of control, all measures demonstrated a significant change in the expected direction. After completing the program, spouses appraised themselves as having more confidence in their problem solving capacities, a stronger tendency to face problem solving activities rather than avoid prob- lems, and better personal control of their behaviors while solving problems related to their dyadic interactions. Both the experimental versus control group analyses and the perception of control analyses yielded substantially similar results. Although from the perception of control analyses, there was a significant change in some variables from the pre- to post-waiting period, the impact of the treatment was made clear by the important gains in all measures from post-waiting to post-program. This small initial gain between the pre- and post-waiting period could have been due to habituation to the testing situation and to the instruments and does not challenge the efficacy of the treatment. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

The results also suggest that the program helped couples improve their marital adjustment independently of how they initially appraised their prob- lem solving abilities. However, the results indicate that cognitive-behavioral group marital therapy had a differential effect on the improvement of self- perceived problem solving capacities depending on the sex of the partic- ipant and on the initial self-appraisal of his/her problem solving abilities. Generally, the program had a favorable impact on women’s perception of self-efficacy, and women who initially perceived themselves as ineffective

114 C. Bélanger et al.

problem solvers reported even more positive changes following the program than those who initially appraised themselves as effective problem solvers. As for men, only those who initially appraised their problem solving abili- ties as ineffective reported improvement in their problem solving appraisal after completion of the program. However, as was the case for women, the program was less useful in helping men who initially perceived themselves as effective problem solvers to change their cognitions. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

These results suggest that cognitive-behavioral marital therapy should include cognitive strategies targeting self-appraisal of problem solving ac- tivities if and only if spouses appraise themselves as ineffective problem solvers before the beginning of the intervention. With partners who appraise themselves as effective problem solvers, this strategy would not be pertinent, and other targets should be identified during the initial assessment. These data are consistent with the results of previous studies that have noted the utility of training for subjects who perceived certain problem solving deficits (Heppner et al., 1988). A possible explanation for the lack of improvement in these spouses could be that they had little room for improvement. For example, the optimal functioning score on the PSI is 32, whereas the highest score, 192, reflects the worst functioning. Men who initially perceived their problem solving abilities as effective had a mean score of 64.5 with a mini- mum approximate score of 51.9, while women had an average score of 77.5 with a minimum approximate score of 66.6. Compared to Heppner’s sample (lowest score of 60; Heppner et al., 1988), it seems that our group of effective problem solvers had particularly strong perceptions of their problem solving abilities. However, both groups reported similar appraisal of their problem solving abilities following treatment. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

It is also possible that the program itself might be designed to be a better fit for the needs of subjects who initially perceived themselves as ineffec- tive problem solvers. Group leaders focused on cognitive (beliefs, self-talk, self-monitoring) and behavioral skills (effective concrete steps of problem solving) during instructions, modeling rehearsal, feedback and homework assignments. Yet, because the sessions were conducted in groups of four couples (eight individuals) and two therapists, it was impossible to con- stantly create individualized learning experiences. It is possible that a more individualized focus on participants’ self-appraisal of problem solving abili- ties would have produced higher gains in the spouses who initially perceived themselves to be effective problem solvers.

The findings of the present study are interesting for several reasons. First, the results support the effectiveness of group marital therapy in altering the cognitive process of self-perceived ineffective problem solvers. Even if treatments for couples paradigms recognize the role of cognitive variables, very few outcome studies have paid attention to this particular aspect. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

These results dovetail nicely, on one hand, with a study by Heppner and his colleagues (1982), who have demonstrated that problem solving

Impact of Group CBT on Marital Happiness and Self-Appraisal 115

self-appraisal is directly related to problem solving competence and, on the other hand, with a previous study by Sabourin and his colleagues (1990), who demonstrated that problem solving self-appraisal is also related to mar- ital adjustment and to specific coping efforts. This research showed that distressed spouses showed less problem solving confidence, a tendency to avoid different problem solving activities, and poor strategies to con- trol their behavior. Thus, in the clinical evaluation of the partners before starting couple therapy, it would be important to verify the couple’s ap- praisal of their problem solving abilities. If partners demonstrate a lack of empowerment, learned helplessness or self-perception of a low capacity to solve problems, the proposed therapeutic intervention should have a positive effect on the development and maintenance of effective problem solving behaviors and consequently on the long-term improvement of their relationship. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

This study has some limitations. There was no follow-up after the con- clusion of treatment to verify if changes in self-appraisal remained in the ab- sence of therapy. Future research should replicate these findings and assess the long-term effects of cognitive-behavioral group marital therapy on the maintenance of effective problem solving self-appraisal and marital satisfac- tion. Furthermore, given the interaction between the initial levels of problem solving self-appraisal and the amount of perceptual change, it would also be important to study subjects who are initially different in their levels of perceived and observed problem solving efficacy (Baucom & Kerig, 2004; Heyman, 2001). It is also possible that this treatment is not unique in its effect on the person’s sense of self-appraisal and that individual therapy, use of homework in therapy, and even other forms of couple therapy may also have improved these skills. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

Another limitation is related to the nature of the measurement used for appraising problem solving abilities. Because this study focused on self- report of problem solving efficacy, inferences regarding related changes in overt problem solving skills are not yet warranted. Future research should examine if problem solving self-appraisal bears a relation to the actual prob- lem solving behaviors of spouses. Therefore, as suggested by Bélanger and his colleagues (2012), behavioral modifications of problem solving inter- actions should be included in future studies. Along these lines, our team recently investigated the relationship between specific coping strategies and problem solving/communication behaviors in close relationships (Bélanger et al., 2012). Observed behaviors were coded using a macroscopic coding system for dyadic interactions (Belanger et al., 1993). For both men and women, results showed significant relationships between coping strategies, problem solving, marital interactions, and marital adjustment (Bélanger et al., 2012). It would be interesting to test how these interactions may change af- ter a cognitive behavioral marital program such as the one we tested in this research. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

116 C. Bélanger et al.

It might also be of interest to see if a cognitive behavioral program for couples that incorporated dyadic coping skills would be helpful for predict- ing marital adjustment. Bodenmann and his colleagues (2001) tested such a program, the Couples Coping Enhancement Training for couples. These researchers showed that following the intervention, couples reported a sig- nificant increase in their appraisal of a number of domains and an increase in the quality of their marital relationship (Bodenmann, Charvoz, Cina, & Wid- mer, 2001). It would be interesting for future studies to integrate appraisals of coping skills and problem solving and of the actual behavioral capacities to get involved and solve problems (Bélanger et al., 1993). Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

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Azrin, M. H., Master, B. J., & Jones, P. (1973). Reciprocity counselling: A learning based procedure for marital couselling. Behavior Research and Therapy, 11, 365–382.

Bandura, A. (1986). Social foundations of thought and action: A social cognitive theory. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall.

Baucom, D. H., Epstein N., Kirby, J. S., & LaTaillade, J. J. (2010). Cognitive-behavioral couple therapy. In K. S. Dobson (Ed.), Handbook of cognitive behavior therapy (pp. 411–444). New York, NY: Guilford Press. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

Baucom, D. H., & Kerig, P. K. (2004). Coding couples’ interactions: Introduction and overview. In P. K. Kerig & D. H. Baucom (Eds.), Couple observational coding systems (pp. 3–10). Mahway, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.

Bélanger, C., Sabourin, S., & El-Baalbaki, G. (2012). Behavioral correlates of coping strategies in close relationships. Europe’s Journal of Psychology (EJOP), 8(3), 449–460.

Bélanger, C., Sabourin, S., Laughrea, K., Dulude, D., & Wright, J. (1993). Macroscopic marital interaction coding systems: Are they interchangeable? Behavior Research and Therapy, 31(8), 789–795.

Bodenmann, G., Charvoz, L., Cina, A., & Widmer, K. (2001). Prevention of marital distress by enhancing the coping skills of couples: 1-year follow-up-study. Swiss Journal of Psychology, 60(1), 3–10.

Bourgeois, L., Sabourin, S., & Wright, J. (1990). Predictive validity of therapeutic alliance in group marital therapy. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 58(5), 608–613.

Butler, A. C., Chapman, J. E., Forman, E. M., & Beck, A. T. (2006). The empirical status of cognitive-behavioral therapy: A review of meta-analyses. Clinical Psychology Review, 26(1), 17–31.

Carré, P. (2004). De l’apprentissage social au sentiment d’efficacité personnelle : autour de l’oeuvre d’Albert Bandura [Social learning to self efficacy: Albert Bandura and his writings]. L’Harmattan Eds.

Dattilio, F. M., & Epstein, N. B. (2005). The role of cognitive-behavioral interventions in couple and family therapy [Edited special section]. Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, 31(1), 7–13.

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Dunn, R. L., & Schwebel, A. I. (1995). Meta-analytic review of marital therapy out- come research. Journal of Family Psychology, 9, 58–68.

Dreer, L., Elliott, T., Fletcher, D., & Swanson, M. (2005). Social problem solving abilities and psychological adjustment of persons in low vision rehabilitation. Rehabilitation Psychology, 50, 232–238.

D’Zurilla, T. J., Maydeu-Olivares, A., & Gallardo-Pujol, D. (2011) Predicting social problem solving using personality traits. Personality and Individual Differences, 50(2), 142–147.

Elliott, T., & Grant, J. (2008). Social problem solving and health. Biennal Review of Counseling Psychology, 1, 295–309.

Elliott, T., Grant, J., & Miller, D. (2004). Social problem solving abilities and behav- ioral health. In E. Chang, T. J. D’Zurilla, & L. J. Sanna (Eds.), Social problem solving: Theory, research, and training (pp. 117–133). Washington, DC: Ameri- can Psychological Association.

Godshall, F. J., & Elliott, T. R. (1997). Behavioral correlates of self-appraised prob- lem solving ability: Problem solving skills and health-compromising behaviors. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 27, 929–944. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

Heppner, P., & Dong-Gwi, L. (2009). Problem solving appraisal and psychological adjustment. In C. R. Snyder & S. J. Lopez (Eds.), The Oxford handbook of positive psychology (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

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Heppner, P. P., & Anderson, W. P. (1985). The relationship between problem solving self-appraisal and psychological adjustment. Cognitive Therapy and Research, 9, 415–427. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

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Copyright of American Journal of Family Therapy is the property of Routledge and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder’s express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

For almost 20 years Metàfora has attracted an international community of students from all over the world for its courses and workshops in Art and Art Therapy.

Housed in an old charismatic factory complex, Metàfora’s Art Therapy department offers a wide range of courses from introductory level to an independent university level MA degree. Although most courses of art therapy are taught in Spanish, two of them, Art and Process and the Summer Intensive are offered in English. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

EASTER INTENSIVE
Easter Intensive and an excellent occasion to see first hand the potential of the art making to get to explore the inner world as well as the first step of a further training in Art Therapy. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

The teachers of Easter Intensive are also teachers of the Master in Art Therapy, art therapists working as clinitians in different institutions, all of them members of the ATe (Spanish Professional Association of Art Therapists). Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

15TH TO 17TH APRIL 2019
SUMMER INTENSIVE
The Summer Intensive is a two weeks Foundation Course in Art Therapy that has been on the run since 2009. The last half of July has gathered a colorful and international crowd of students and professionals in our creative oasis. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

Making most of the joyful cultural summer in Barcelona. Students are exposed to experiential workshops, talks and daily Art Therapy seminars in an intensive format of morning to afternoons.

15TH TO 25TH OF JULY 2019
ART & PROCESS
This course is a 6 week full time training, which combines the traditional studio arts atmosphere of Metàfora’s art courses with theory and teaching methodology of its Art Therapy department.

All students of A&P have a personal studio space, an individual tutor and access to all the classes in tools and techniques offered on the studio arts program. It is a chance to learn the basics of art therapy while having an intensive studio practice. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

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The PMHNP is meeting with a husband and wife and observes that the husband is able to maintain his composure while the wife becomes more teary and emotional throughout the session. Which principle is used to describe this observation?

Complementary relationship
Symmetrical relationship
C.NURS 6650 Psychotherapy For Families And Groups Midterm And Final Exam Study Guide

D.
The PMHNP is meeting with a family consisting of two parents and their 10-year-old son. The parents are concerned about the child’s behavior. “He keeps disobeying us. All he does is misbehave,” the mother cries. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

The PMHNP meets individually with the son for a few sessions to learn more about his behavior and identifies that he is participating in attention-seeking behaviors. When the PMHNP invites the parents and son back to a family group setting, what action made by the PMHNP supports the use of constructivism? NURS 6650 Psychotherapy For Families And Groups Midterm And Final Exam Study Guide

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Providing the
B.

Getting the parents to think about their child as being hyperactive, rather than misbehaving
D.The PMHNP is working with a married couple in a family session setting.

The wife reports feeling upset because her husband does not pay attention to her. Which statement made by the PMHNP will challenge the wife to see things differently? Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

“Why do you think your husband ignores you at home?”
“How does it make you feel when your husband ignores you?”
“How might you be contributing to your husband not paying you any attention?”
NURS 6650 Psychotherapy For Families And Groups Midterm And Final Exam Study Guide

“What can you say to your husband to get him to change his actions?”
The PMHNP is working with a father and his teenage daughter. The father has full custody of his daughter as of recently. He reports that the two of them get into arguments all the time over curfew, chores, and the daughter’s lack of responsibility that “she gets from her mother.” The daughter feels like the father never listens to her. Which of the following actions taken by the PMHNP demonstrates unbalancing the relationship? Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.
Telling the father that he might be patient enough with the newness of having a teenage daughter in the house all the time
Asking the daughter to describe how she feels about the transition of living with her father full time
Inviting the father to speak directly to the daughter about what she can do to accommodate his lifestyle
Recommending the father find a hobby outside of the house to give his daughter alone time
A man calls a PMHNP to set up an initial appointment for family therapy. He explains, “My wife lost her job several months ago. She has been angry and less patient with the kids. All of the stress is taking a toll on me. I can’t focus at the office and I’m mentally exhausted at home.” Based on this phone contact, who would the PMHNP most likely choose to see for the first session? NURS 6650 Psychotherapy For Families And Groups Midterm And Final Exam Study Guide
The husband alone
The wife alone
The couple alone
The family as a unit
The PMHNP is assessing a family that consists of a mother and a father and their daughter Rachel. The family is discussing the issue of time management in the home, particularly involving the daughter’s extracurricular schedule. The mother asks, “Rachel, how many times has your father been late to pick you up from soccer?” What does the PMHNP take away from this interaction?
The family uses a fight or flight response to conflict.
The family is dependent on one another. NURS 6650 Psychotherapy For Families And Groups Midterm And Final Exam Study Guide
The family is involved in pairing. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.
The family requires unfreezing.
The PMHNP meets with the parents of a 3-year-old boy, who was adopted at 6 months of age. The parents ask the PMHNP if he will see the child individually for therapy sessions on a weekly basis, based on the fact that the parents are having difficulty getting their son to listen to them. Which statement made by the PMHNP supports the systems theory approach to treatment? NURS 6650 Psychotherapy For Families And Groups Midterm And Final Exam Study Guide
“It would be difficult for me to make sense of your child’s behavior without the rest of the family around.” Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.
“It would be better for us to meet as a group since your child likely has attachment issues.”
C.NURS 6650 Psychotherapy For Families And Groups Midterm And Final Exam Study Guide

D.
The PMHNP is working with a married couple who are having trouble communicating. The wife wants to ask for things from the husband, but she doesn’t want to be perceived as a nag. The husband wants to tell the wife that he needs alone time, but he doesn’t want to hurt her feelings. Which pretend technique can the PMHNP use with the couple? NURS 6650 Psychotherapy For Families And Groups Midterm And Final Exam Study Guide

Ask the husband what he thinks the wife would say about his behavior
Ask the couple to engage in negotiation
Tell the husband to call the wife a nag three times a day
A and C
The PMHNP is working with a single mother and her adolescent son. The mother reports to the PMHNP that all she wants is for her son to call her when he is going to be late to dinner, so that she doesn’t worry about where he is. The son explains that his mom is “too paranoid” and calls or texts him constantly throughout the day, even if it doesn’t have to do with his whereabouts. How can the PMHNP advise the mother and son to accommodate one another?
Recommend the mother to limit her texts and calls to her son throughout the day
Recommend the son to send his mother a text when he is going to be late
Recommend the mother and son to stop being so hard on one another
D.NURS 6650 Psychotherapy For Families And Groups Midterm And Final Exam Study Guide
A PMHNP is using a structural family therapy approach. During a family therapy session, a child says, “Is that what you really mean?” Tracking the phrase, the PMHNP discovers that the family often uses sarcasm when communicating. What is the appropriate next step by the PMHNP?

NURS 6650 Psychotherapy For Families And Groups Midterm And Final Exam Study Guide

Make each member apologize to the other whenever sarcasm is used during the session
Ask the family to point out when a statement is sarcastic so others know they are joking
Listen for the use of sarcasm and, when it occurs, help members communicate more directly
Have members put a quarter in the “sarcasm jar” each time a sarcastic statement is used
The PMHNP is meeting with a set of parents and their 12-year-old son, who according to the parents is fearful of “nearly everything.” The son admits that he does not like to ride his bike, play with his friends, or participate in activities such as sports, in which he could hurt himself or become dirty. What does the PMHNP say to the son to personify the problem using externalizing conversation techniques?
“What can you do when you become scared of something?”
“How is being fearful controlling your life?” NURS 6650 Psychotherapy For Families And Groups Midterm And Final Exam Study Guide Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.
“How often does fear make you do what it wants you to do?”
“Why do you feel so fearful?”
A PMHNP is working with a mother and daughter to help them improve their communication skills. The mother explains that they have had numerous arguments caused by miscommunication lately. Using a structural family therapy approach, what is the appropriate response by the PMHNP? NURS 6650 Psychotherapy For Families And Groups Midterm And Final Exam Study Guide
“Perhaps ”
“Please
“I’m going to ask you to .”
NURS 6650 Psychotherapy For Families And Groups Midterm And Final Exam Study Guide
During family therapy, a husband says to his spouse, “When you ignore me, I can’t help but shout.” Using an emotionally focused family therapy approach, the PMHNP comments to the husband, “You feel like you are invisible and need to be heard.” Why does the PMHNP make this comment?

To assist the couple in creating new attachment patterns
To get the couple to recognize an intimate attachment
To help the client capture an elusive emotional experience
To align with the client as a gesture of supportiveness
A family is in therapy because they have been unable to resolve conflicts and are arguing frequently. When using a strategic family therapy approach, which of the following directives might the PMHNP suggest to create a sense of togetherness?
Encourage the family to address concerns by writing letters to each other
B.NURS 6650 Psychotherapy For Families And Groups Midterm And Final Exam Study Guide

Ask the family to engage in pleasant activities following the problem behavior
D. Exaggerate in a fun family ritual by preparing for the event in a specific order

NURS 6650 Psychotherapy For Families And Groups Midterm And Final Exam Study Guide

In a 2- to 3-page paper, address the following:

Explain the group’s processes and stage of formation.
Explain curative factors that occurred in the group. Include how these factors might impact client progress.
Explain intragroup conflict that occurred and recommend strategies for managing the conflict. Support your recommendations with evidence-based literature. NURS 6650 Psychotherapy For Families And Groups Midterm And Final Exam Study Guide
American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (5th ed.). Washington, DC: Author. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

Bélanger, C., Laporte, L., Sabourin, S., & Wright, J. (2015). The effect of cognitive-behavioral group marital therapy on marital happiness and problem solving self-appraisal. American Journal of Family Therapy, 43(2), 103-118. doi:10.1080/01926187.2014.956614

Bjornsson, A. S., Bidwell, L. C., Brosse, A. L., Carey, G., Hauser, M., Mackiewicz Seghete, K. L., & … Craighead, W. E. (2011). Cognitive-behavioral group therapy versus group psychotherapy for social anxiety disorder among college students: A randomized controlled trial. Depression and Anxiety, 28(11), 1034-1042. doi:10.1002/da.20877

Bond, C., Woods, K., Humphrey, N., Symes, W., & Green, L. (2013). Practitioner review: The effectiveness of solution focused brief therapy with children and families: A systematic and critical evaluation of the literature from 1990-2010. Journal of Child Psychology & Psychiatry, 54(7), 707-723. doi:10.1111/jcpp.12058

NURS 6650 Psychotherapy For Families And Groups Midterm And Final Exam Study Guide

Bonhote, K., Romano-Egan, J., & Cornwell, C. (1999). Altruism and creative expressions in a long-term older adult psychotherapy group. Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 20(6), 603-617. doi:10.1080/016128499248394

Cheston, R., & Jones, R. (2009). A small-scale study comparing the impact of psycho-education and exploratory psychotherapy groups on newcomers to a group for people with dementia. Aging & Mental Health, 13(3), 420-425. doi:10.1080/13607860902879409

Cohn, A. S. (2014). Romeo and Julius: A narrative therapy intervention for sexual-minority couples. Journal of Family Psychotherapy, 25(1), 73-77. doi:10.1080/08975353.2014.881696

Conoley, C., Graham, J., Neu, T., Craig, M., O’Pry, A., Cardin, S., & … Parker, R. (2003). Solution-focused family therapy with three aggressive and oppositional-acting children: An N=1 empirical study. Family Process, 42(3), 361-374. PMID: 14606200

NURS 6650 Psychotherapy For Families And Groups Midterm And Final Exam Study Guide

Crane-Okada, R. (2012). The concept of presence in group psychotherapy: An operational definition. Perspectives in Psychiatric Care, 48(3), 156-164. doi:10.1111/j.1744-6163.2011.00320.x

de Castro, S., & Guterman, J. (2008). Solution-focused therapy for families coping with suicide. Journal of Marital & Family Therapy, 34(1), 93-106. doi: 10.111/j.1752-0606.2008.00055.x.

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Escudero, V., Friedlander, M. L., Boogmans, E., & Loots, G. (2012). Alliance rupture and repair in conjoint family therapy: An exploratory study. Psychotherapy, 49(1), 26-37. doi:10.1037/a0026747

NURS 6650 Psychotherapy For Families And Groups Midterm And Final Exam Study Guide

Freedman, J. (2014). Witnessing and positioning: Structuring narrative therapy with families and couples. Australian & New Zealand Journal of Family Therapy, 35(1), 20-30. doi:10.1002/anzf.104

Freedman, J. (2014). Witnessing and positioning: Structuring narrative therapy with families and couples. Australian & New Zealand Journal of Family Therapy, 35(1), 20-30. doi:10.1002/anzf.1043

Gamble, J., & O’ Lawrence, H. (2016). An overview of the efficacy of the 12-step group therapy for substance abuse treatment. Journal of Health & Human Services Administration, 39(1), 142-160.Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

NURS 6650 Psychotherapy For Families And Groups Midterm And Final Exam Study Guide

Himelhoch, S., Medoff, D., & Oyeniyi, G. (2007). Efficacy of group psychotherapy to reduce depressive symptoms among HIV-infected individuals: A systematic review and meta-analysis. AIDS Patient Care & Stds, 21(10), 732-739.

Khawaja, I. S., Pollock, K., & Westermeyer, J. J. (2011). The diminishing role of psychiatry in group psychotherapy: A commentary and recommendations for change. Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience, 8(11), 20-23.

Kim, J. W., Choi, Y. S., Shin, K. C., Kim, O. H., Lee, D. Y., Jung, M. H., & … Choi, I. (2012). The effectiveness of continuing group psychotherapy for outpatients with alcohol dependence: 77-month outcomes. Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research, 36(4), 686-692. doi:10.1111/j.1530-0277.2011.01643.x

Koukourikos, K., & Pasmatzi, E. (2014). Group therapy in psychotic inpatients. Health Science Journal, 8(3), 400-408.

NURS 6650 Psychotherapy For Families And Groups Midterm And Final Exam Study Guide

L’Abate, L. (2015). Highlights from 60 years of practice, research, and teaching in family therapy. American Journal of Family Therapy, 43(2), 180-196. doi:10.1080/01926187.2014.100236

Lego, S. (1998). The application of Peplau’s theory to group psychotherapy. Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, 5(3), 193-196. doi:10.1046/j.1365-2850.1998.00129.x

Lerner, M. D., McLeod, B. D., & Mikami, A. Y. (2013). Preliminary evaluation of an observational measure of group cohesion for group psychotherapy. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 69(3), 191-208. doi:10.1002/jclp.21933

NURS 6650 Psychotherapy For Families And Groups Midterm And Final Exam Study Guide

Leszcz, M., & Kobos, J. C. (2008). Evidence-based group psychotherapy: Using AGPA’s practice guidelines to enhance clinical effectiveness. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 64(11), 1238-1260. doi:10.1002/jclp.2053

Marmarosh, C. L. (2014). Empirical research on attachment in group psychotherapy: Moving the field forward. Psychotherapy, 51(1), 88-92. doi:10.1037/a003252

McGillivray, J. A., & Evert, H. T. (2014). Group cognitive behavioural therapy program shows potential in reducing symptoms of depression and stress among young people with ASD. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 44(8), 2041-2051. doi:10.1007/s10803-014-2087-9

NURS 6650 Psychotherapy For Families And Groups Midterm And Final Exam Study Guide

McNeil, S. N., Herschberger, J. K., & Nedela, M. N. (2013). Low-income families with potential adolescent gang involvement: A structural community family therapy integration model. American Journal of Family Therapy, 41(2), 110-120. doi:10.1080/01926187.2011.649110

Méndez, N. A., Qureshi, M. E., Carnerio, R., & Hort, F. (2014). The intersection of Facebook and structural family therapy volume 1. American Journal of Family Therapy, 42(2), 167-174. doi:10.1080/01926187.2013.794046

Mojta, C., Falconier, M. K., & Huebner, A. J. (2014). Fostering self-awareness in novice therapists using internal family systems therapy. American Journal of Family Therapy, 42(1), 67-78. doi:10.1080/01926187.2013.772870

Nichols, M., & Tafuri, S. (2013). Techniques of structural family assessment: A qualitative analysis of how experts promote a systemic perspective. Family Process, 52(2), 207-215. doi:10.1111/famp.12025

Papero, D. V. (2014). Assisting the two-person system: An approach based on the Bowen theory. Australian & New Zealand Journal of Family Therapy, 35(4), 386-397. doi:10.1002/anzf.1079

NURS 6650 Psychotherapy For Families And Groups Midterm And Final Exam Study Guide

Patterson, T. (2014). A cognitive behavioral systems approach to family therapy. Journal of Family Psychotherapy, 25(2), 132-144. doi:10.1080/08975353.2014.910023

Perry, A. (2014). Cognitive behavioral therapy with couples and families. Sexual & Relationship Therapy, 29(3), 366-367. doi:10.1080/14681994.2014.909024

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NURS 6650 Psychotherapy For Families And Groups Midterm And Final Exam Study Guide

Ramisch, J., McVicker, M., & Sahin, Z. (2009). Helping low-conflict divorced parents establish appropriate boundaries using a variation of the miracle question: An integration of solution-focused therapy and structural family therapy. Journal of Divorce & Remarriage, 50(7), 481-495. doi:10.1080/10502550902970587

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NURS 6650 Psychotherapy For Families And Groups Midterm And Final Exam Study Guide

Rice, A. (2015). Common therapeutic factors in bereavement groups. Death Studies, 39(3), 165-172. doi:10.1080/07481187.2014.946627

Ryan, W. J., Conti, R. P., & Simon, G. M. (2013). Presupposition compatibility facilitates treatment fidelity in therapists learning structural family therapy. American Journal of Family Therapy, 41(5), 403-414. doi:10.1080/01926187.2012.727673

NURS 6650 Psychotherapy For Families And Groups Midterm And Final Exam Study Guide

Safak, Y., Karadere, M. E., Ozdel, K., Ozcan, T., Türkçapar, M. H., Kuru, E., & Yücens, B. (2014). The effectiveness of cognitive behavioral group psychotherapy for obsessive-compulsive disorder. Turkish Journal of Psychiatry, 25(4), 225-233.

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NURS 6650 Psychotherapy For Families And Groups Midterm And Final Exam Study Guide

Sayın, A., Candansayar, S., & Welkin, L. (2013). Group psychotherapy in women with a history of sexual abuse: What did they find helpful? Journal of Clinical Nursing, 22(23/24), 3249-3258. doi:10.1111/jocn.1216

Sheehan, A. H., & Friedlander, M. L. (2015). Therapeutic alliance and retention in brief strategic family therapy: A mixed-methods study. Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, 41(4), 415-427. doi:10.1111/jmft.12113

​Szapocznik, J., Muir, J. A., Duff, J. H., Schwartz, S. J., & Brown, C. H. (2015). Brief strategic family therapy: Implementing evidence-based models in community settings. Psychotherapy Research: Journal of the Society for Psychotherapy Research, 25(1), 121-133. doi:10.1080/10503307.2013.856044

NURS 6650 Psychotherapy For Families And Groups Midterm And Final Exam Study Guide

Tasca, G. A. (2014). Attachment and group psychotherapy: Introduction to a special section. Psychotherapy, 51(1), 53-56. doi:10.1037/a0033015

Tasca, G. A., Francis, K., & Balfour, L. (2014). Group psychotherapy levels of interventions: A clinical process commentary. Psychotherapy, 51(1), 25-29. doi:10.1037/a0032520

Wang, C., Tzeng, D., & Chung, W. (2014). The effect of early group psychotherapy on depressive symptoms and quality of life among residents of an apartment building for seniors. Psychogeriatrics: The Official Journal of the Japanese Psychogeriatric Society, 14(1), 38-46. doi:10.1111/psyg.12037

Washington, K. T., Wittenberg-Lyles, E., Parker Oliver, D., Baldwin, P. K., Tappana, J., Wright, J. H., & Demiris, G. (2014). Rethinking family caregiving: Tailoring cognitive–behavioral therapies to the hospice experience. Health & Social Work, 39(4), 244-250. doi:hsw/hlu031

NURS 6650 Psychotherapy For Families And Groups Midterm And Final Exam Study Guide

Watkins, R., Cheston, R., Jones, K., & Gilliard, J. (2006). ‘Coming out’ with Alzheimer’s disease: Changes in awareness during a psychotherapy group for people with dementia. Aging & Mental Health, 10(2), 166-176. PMID: 16517492

Yildiran, H., & Holt, R. R. (2015). Thematic analysis of the effectiveness of an inpatient mindfulness group for adults with intellectual disabilities. British Journal of Learning Disabilities, 43(1), 49-54. doi:10.1111/bld.12085

NURS 6650 Psychotherapy For Families And Groups Midterm And Final Exam Study Guide

A beautifully presented and balanced approach to Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: A beautifully presented and balanced approach to Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, rich in recommended resources for further study or inquiry. Whether teacher, student, parent, child, sibling, friend or health professional, these ‘evidence-based’ approaches to sifting out the nonsense that accumulates in our thinking are an invaluable tool for living a calm and fulfilled life, no matter what your own circumstances might be. Highly recommended.” — Athea Howard

“Look inward, find strength: As Marcus Aurelius said, ‘You have power over your mind, not outside events. Realize this and you will find strength.’ Life is constantly pushing us to adapt to circumstances. But we can waste so much time trying to change the material things around us. If you’re unhappy being poor, having more jewelry or bling will not help you feel better. Money is important in so far as it takes away the pain of not having enough. But to REALLY feel better you have to go to the source of all emotions: the brain. Train your brain and you directly affect your life. It doesn’t have to be anything major. I’ve found that meditating for 20 minutes in the morning (recognizing thoughts as just thoughts) and writing in a journal at night has improved my life 80%.– Jose J.

“Inspiring and insightful… the book will definitely help you get back on your feet, since its contents is really engaging.– Jonah

Our Brain is So Powerful: Not many people understand depression or other mental conditions… This book really helps people like me who are seeking help. It is about time to have a book that truly understands and explains the importance of careful and mindful thinking.”– Miss. Italia

nurs 6650 psychotherapy with groups and families midterm & final exam questions and answers
The PMHNP is working with a family during their first therapy session. According to the Gestalt school of perception, what must the PMHNP do to change the group behavior?
A. Create a process/content distinction with the familyB. Help the family maintain homeostasisC.D.
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The PMHNP is meeting with the parents of a school-aged girl. The mother reports feeling frustrated, because they cannot get their daughter to do her homework. “All she wants to do is play on her phone,” the father reports. The mother tells the PMHNP that they have tried threatening her by telling her that she won’t be able to have her friends over and that she won’t be allowed to watch TV. Which of the following responses made by the PMHNP demonstrates use of the Premack principle? NURS 6650 Midterm & Final Exam – Questions and Answers Walden Study Guide
A. “Do you know what other parents do for their kids, and does it work for them?”B. “Have you tried making her phone privileges contingent on finishing her homework?”C.D. “Can you think of a time when your daughter did her homework without you having to ask her?”
During a family therapy session, the mother says, “I don’t know why my son is always in trouble at school. He does what he wants to do.” The father adds, “He’s almost 14 years old. It’s up to him to get his life in order.” What is the most appropriate intervention by the PMHNP?
A. Encourage the family to spend some time at home becoming enmeshedB
C.
D. Ask the parents to experiment with being excessively involved in their son’s life
The PMHNP is discussing problem-solving techniques with a married couple. What recommendation will the PMHNP provide to the couple?
A. ”B. “Avoid trying to discuss things when your partner is busy with other things.”C. .”D. “Speak on behalf of your partner to show that you understand.”
During a family therapy session, the PMHNP hears the father say to the son, “You shouldn’t play video games where you shoot people.” According to the Bion school of thought, what is the content of the message that the father is trying to express?
B. “You should find other things to do with your time.”C. “.”D. “You will grow up and want to shoot people if you keep playing those games.”
A couple and their 13-year-old daughter have been in family therapy. The mother explains that her daughter is unhappy at private school and would like to be in public school. The father has been listening quietly and then says, “We are upset that our daughter wants to leave private school.” When using a systemic family therapy approach, what is the appropriate response by the PMHNP to the father?
A. “Please elaborate on why you and your wife are not happy about this.”B. “I’d like for you to rephrase your statement starting with ‘I am upset.’”C.D. “If I understand correctly, you are both upset about this situation.”
The PMHNP is working wi….s and poor impulse control. Using the differentiation of self-concept, what advice does the PMHNP offer the child?
A. “When something bothers you, stop to think about it before you react to it.”B. “You should pra….o something.”C. “It can beD. “Let your n so
The PMHNP is assessing a 19-year-old patient who reports feeling burdened and constrained by her family. “I feel like I can’t live my own life, and like I need their approval for everything I do,” she says during the assessment. Which response by the PMHNP supports the principles of family therapy?
A. “It’s important for you to feel safe to explore the full range of your feelings.”B. “.”C. “.”D. “Family is there .”
NURS 6650 MIDTERM & FINAL EXAM – QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS WALDEN STUDY GUIDE
The PMHNP is meeting with a woman and her 11-year-old child, who was a victim of sexual abuse. The offender is the child’s stepfather, who is currently in jail. What action does the PMHNP employ with the child and mother during the first session?
A. ProB. Asking the child and mother to describe the sexual abuse as it occurredC. NURS 6650 Midterm & Final Exam – Questions and Answers Walden Study GuideD. Giving the child and mother a choice about how much to discuss
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The PMHNP is meeting with the parents of a school-aged girl. The mother reports feeling frustrated, because they cannot get their daughter to do her homework. “All she wants to do is play on her phone,” the father reports. The mother tells the PMHNP that they have tried threatening her by telling her that she won’t be able to have her friends over and that she won’t be allowed to watch TV. Which of the following responses made by the PMHNP demonstrates use of the Premack principle?A.B. “C. “Why do you think your daughter doesn’t want to do her homework?”D.
During a family therapy session, the mother says, “I don’t know why my son is always in trouble at school. He does what he wants to do.” The father adds, “He’s almost 14 years old. It’s up to him to get his life in order.” What is the most appropriate intervention by the PMHNP?A.B. Ask the parents to elaborate on why they don’t know much about their son’s lifeC. Give the family an assignment to spend quality time together before the next sessionD. Ask the parents to … in their son’s life
The PMHNP is discussing problem-solving techniques with a married couple. What recommendation will the PMHNP provide to the couple?A. “.”B. “Avoid trying to discuss things when your partner is busy with other things.”C. “gs.”D. “Speak on behalf of your partner to show that you understand.”During a family therapy session, the PMHNP hears the father say to the son, “You shouldn’t play video games where you shoot people.” According to the Bion school of thought, what is the content of the message that the father is trying to express?A.B. “You should find other things to do with your time.”C.D. “You will grow up and want to shoot people if you keep playing those games.”
A couple and their 13-year-old daughter have been in family therapy. The mother explains that her daughter is unhappy at private school and would like to be in public school. The father has been listening quietly and then says, “We are upset that our daughter wants to leave private school.” When using a systemic family therapy approach, what is the appropriate response by the PMHNP to the father?A. “Please elaborate on why you and your wife are not happy about this.”B.C. “D. “If I understand correctly, you are both upset about this situation.”
The PMHNP is working with a father and his son, who is 7 years old. According to the father, the son frequently experiences outbursts and poor impulse control. Using the differentiation of self-concept, what advice does the PMHNP offer the child? NURS 6650 Midterm & Final Exam – Questions and AnswersA.B.C. “It can be helpful to react immediately with how you are feeling.”D. “Let your father know when something he does triggers you to feel bad.”
The PMHNP is assessing a ….wn life, and like I need their approval for everything I do,” she says during the assessment. Which response by the PMHNP supports the principles of family therapy?A. “It’s important for you to .”B. “You are part of a whole, big network that extends to more than just yourself.”C. “Your authentic self may l.”D. “Family is there for .”Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.
The PMHNP is meeting with a woman an…. is currently in jail. What action does the PMHNP employ with the child and mother during the first session?A. Providing the child and mother an outline of the things to cover during the session, to make it easier for them to open upB. Asking the childC. Telling the child toD. Giving the child and mother a
The PMHNP is working with a patient who i….. Which of the following is an appropriate scaling question for the PMHNP to ask?A. “What have you done to keep your?”B. “If feel?”C. “What happens during the moments when ?”D. “How many days per week are you able to sleep?”
The PMHNP is providing family therapy to two parents and their twin 14-year-old children. The children become defiant around bedtime and are still working on their homework late into the night. How does the PMHNP employ an experiential technique of family sculpting?A. Asks one of the parents toB. Asks each person to comment onC. Asks the twin children to explain why they doD. Asks the parents to talk to their kids about the importance of bedtime
Using a systemic family therapy approach, a PMHNP is meeting with a couple for an initial session and is asking each member to describe why he or she came to family therapy. After creating a genogram, the PMHNP says, “I can see that the men in your family are often the sole providers, and the women have been in charge of running the household.” Which is the most appropriate next response by the PMHNP?A.B. “Do you see why this may be causing a dysfunctional relationship?”C. “This is likely the reason for your problems.”D. “These days, traditional roles are not the norm.”
A PMHNP learns that the family has been experiencing dysfunction because a mother and her teenage son have been getting easily annoyed and yelling at each other. When using a strategic family therapy approach, which directive should the PMHNP suggest to solve the problem?A. Have the familyB. Encourage theC. Ask the family to amplifying the behaviorD.Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.
The PMHNP is meeting with parents who are having difficulty disciplining their child at home during his emotional and behavioral outbursts. The mother feels that the father is too strict but realizes that she is tired of getting “walked on” by their child. Which statement made by the PMHNP demonstrates the use of internal family systems therapy model?A. “Each person in the family has certain roles to fulfill. You might be taking on a less active role when it comes to disciplining your child because of the experiences you had in your own childhood.”B. “As a parent, you can create the dynamic and relationships you want. Maybe you could try asking your husband to be less strict with your child and see what kind of response you get from your child.”C. “It sounds like there’s a part of you that thinks your husband is too strict, but another part of you that thinks you should be stricter yourself. What does that second part of you look or sound like?”D.Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.
The PMHNP is meeting with a married couple. The woman feels very insecure, particularly when it comes to her husband working with women in his office. She reports, “My girlfriends say that it’s not attractive to be insecure like I am, so I’m really making the problem worse by being so insecure.” How can the PMHNP externalize the woman’s problem? NURS 6650 Midterm & Final Exam – Questions and AnswersA. Have the womanB. Help the woman from the label of “insecure”C. Have the woman make a list of all the things about which she is insecureD.
NURS 6650 MIDTERM & FINAL EXAM – QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS WALDEN STUDY GUIDEThe PMHNP is working with a married couple who have agreed to seek sex therapy due to the wife’s gradual decrease in interest in sex. The wife explains that she feels as though she cannot feel comfortable naked and enjoying being intimate. The PMHNP recognizes that the couple could possibly benefit from sensate focus. To apply the sensate focus exercise, the PMHNP suggests the couple first do what? NURS 6650 Midterm & Final Exam – Questions and Answers Walden Study GuideA. Practice desensitizing themselves from sex so that they do not feel any anxietyB. Deprive themselves of sensations so that the urge builds up and the interest in sex resumesC. Find a time when they can be free from distraction and try to relaxD.The PMHNP works with a husband and a wife, but in separate sessions, to address marital issues. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.One day, the wife asks the PMHNP how her husband is progressing with his therapy. Which response made by the PMHNP is most appropriate?A. “I’m sorry, but I cannot discuss his treatment with you, as it is private.”B. “I can only speak to you about his sessions if your husband gives me permission to.”C.D. NURS 6650 Midterm & Final Exam – Questions and Answers Walden Study Guide
The PMHNP is meeting with a family composed of two parents and their two children. The PMHNP observes that the mother projects her concerns onto one of the children, and that child seems to conform to the parents’ way of thinking. The other child seems to be less involved in the family’s fusion. What action taken by the PMHNP demonstrates the use of the Bowen Family Systems Therapy model?A. HelpingB. Helping differentiate the child who is less involved in the family fusionC. A and BD.
The PMHNP is performing an intake assessment on parents who had their son later in life. Since their son left for college 6 months ago, the couple reports arguing a lot and not getting along in general. When applying the theory of the family life cycle, what does the PMHNP say in response to this concern?A. “These sorts of experiences can be normal. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.You are going through a major transition period that is forcing you to question or readjust your relationship.”B. “It’s very common for people who have children later in life to experience this kind of relationship turbulence once children move out of the house.”C. “This is an issue that can be worked out by reconstructing the events of your lives up until the point at which your son left for college.”D.The PMHNP is meeting with a….nce with the nighttime feedings so she can get more than 3 hours of sleep at night. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.The husband feels like this is an unfair request, because the wife no longer works, but she still asks the husband to do a lot of errands during the day. What does the PMHNP do to create a quid pro quo contract between the husband and wife?A. Suggest the wife to a….ee to do one nighttime feedingB. Convince the coupl….rt sleeping longer during the nightC. Recommend that the husband and wife …. of the home and without the baby aroundD. Suggest that the wife consider going back to work to help even out the daily demands of working and parenting
The PMHNP is working with a family consisting of a father, a mother, and a daughter who is a sophomore in high school. The issue being discussed has to do with the daughter’s emotional outbursts about wanting to spend more time with her friends. Recently, the daughter blew up at the parents over the fact that they wouldn’t let her go to a party, since older kids from the school were throwing it. This outburst led to arguments in the household, which led to the daughter getting grounded for 2 weeks. Which theory does the PMHNP recognize as the most applicable?
theory
B.C. SocialDThe PMHNP is meeting with a mother and her 9-year-old child. The child is upset that the father left the house and hasn’t been back in a long time. Which action will the PMHNP perform to employ the role-playing technique with the child?A. Have the child draw his relationship to his father on a piece of paperB. Set up an empty space on the couch and have the child talk to the father as if he were sitting thereC. Ask the child to arrange a scene in the room of what would happen when the father comes back homeD. Ask the child to discuss how he feels about his father being gone
The PMHNP is working with a family that includes two parents and their two children. The PMHNP defined the problem and goal in a previous session. Today, the PMHNP wants to find out whether the family has experienced any attempted solutions. What does the PMHNP identify as an attempted solution that actually perpetuates the family problem?A. The parents fail to punish both children for stealing alcohol from the kitchen and drinking in their rooms.B.C. The wife wishes the husband would spend more time at home, and the husband tries to make her feel better by paying for a trip to visit her sister.D.
The PMHNP is working with parents who argue about ways to discipline their school-aged son. The PMHNP initiates enactment, telling the parents to discuss the disciplinary choices directly with each other. At what point does the PMHNP determine that the parents are demonstrating enmeshment?A. The mother…..B. The father speaks on ….when the PMHNP asks ….question.C. The father ….onstantly babies their son by doing things for him that he is old enough to do for himself.D.
The PMHNP is working with 12-year-old twin sisters. Their parents report that the …. Which cognitive interaction can the PMHNP use to help the sisters gain a new perspective of the argument to help soften their own opinion of it?A. Have the sistersB. Encourage the sistersC. Recommend the sisters write each other an apology letterD. Suggest the sisters find something they both like and can relate to
The PMHNP has just completed….and believes the patient would benefit from family therapy. How does the PMHNP describe the goals of the therapy to the patient and the patient’s parents? NURS 6650 Midterm & Final Exam – Questions and Answers Walden Study GuideA. “One goal of family therapy is to help the family understand each other and work together to form a strong family bond.B. “Our goal is toC. “Our goal is toD.The PMHNP is working with a family in a group setting. When employing the experiential technique, what action will the PMHNP take with the family during assessment?A. Conduct a.B. Assess theC. Analyze each family member individually while they are in the same roomD. Ask the family members to participate in an association game
The PMHNP is meeting with a single father and his adolescent daughter. They have been “butting heads” because of the daughter’s differing opinions about her curfew and social life. They haven’t been able to communicate well. The PMHNP tries an experiential technique of family drawing. What will the PMHNP have the father and daughter do for this technique?A. DrawB. Draw a picture of what they wish they could say to each otherC. Draw a picture of their behaviors and actions, without using any wordsD. All of the above
The PMHNP wants to identify the unique outcomes of a married couple who are having arguments about finances. In particular, the wife is concerned about her husband splurging without consulting her. What question will the PMHNP ask to arrive at the unique outcomes?A. “How do affect you?”B. “How do these your ideas about yourself?”C. “How does the affect the relationship you have with each other?”D. All of the above
The PMHNP is meeting with a mother and her teenage daughter; they are having trouble getting along. The mother complains that the daughter is defiant and never listens or goes out whenever she wants to. The daughter complains that the mother is too strict and won’t let her see her friends. What does the PMHNP do to employ the use of the paradoxical intervention technique?A. Tell the mother to … consequencesB. Tell the daughter to …. whenever she wants toC. Tell the mother and daughter to discuss how their actions affect each others’ feelingsD.
The PMHNP meets with an older adult couple having marital problems. The husband and wife both admit to the PMHNP that it is d….lains that the wife is always talking about their issues to their adult daughter. The wife reports that the husband does the same thing. Using the Bowen Family Systems Therapy model, what does the PMHNP interpret about this family dynamic?A. There is an emotional cutoff between the parents and their adult daughter.B.C. The parents are not dealing with their conflict by involving the daughter.D. All of th above
The PMHNP is meeting with a husband and wife who have separated but are trying to rekindle the marriage. The PMHNP asks the couple what they hope to gain from the sessions, and they provide the PMHNP with vague answers. What can the PMHNP can ask the couple to help them create better defined goals?A. “Specifically, how will you accomplish this?”B. “How will you know when you solved your problem?”C. “What will be the first sign that tells you that you are moving in the right direction?”D. All of the above
NURS 6650 MIDTERM & FINAL EXAM – QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS WALDEN STUDY GUIDEDuring a family therapy session, a 10-year-old girl says to her father, “You are at work all the time and are never around.” What is the most appropriate response by the PMHNP to improve communication?A. Suggest that the daughter nowB. Ask the father what he heard when his daughter made that commentC. Tell the daughter thatD. Give the father a chance to explain why he is working all the time
The PMHNP is working with the parents of an 8-year-old. They are facing challenges with their daughter’s school because of her behavior toward other students. “Our daughter has become a problem,” they explain. Which statement(s) made by the PMHNP supports the use of the narrative therapy model?A. “Your daughter is facing a… herself.”B. “The problem is the … daughter.”C.D.
A group member realizes he ….hen making small talk and tends to talk only about himself. Using the principle of development of socializing techniques, what might the PMHNP recommend that the group do next?A. Give the member feedback on what the group participants have noticed about he seems anxiousB. Share emotions about similar struggles toC. Reflect on ways they can work together toD. iscuss how the might relate to the problem
The PMHNP is working with the parents of an adolescent daughter. The parents complain that the daughter is misbehaving and having emotional outbursts on a nightly basis. However, the parents cannot agree on ways to discipline and deal with the daughter. This leads to arguments between them. What does the PMHNP do to support the strategic use of rituals?A. Suggest the mom help the daughter with homework on even days of the weekB. Ask the dad how his daughter might describe the mother’s attitude in the houseC. Have the parents reframe their daughter’s symptoms to validate their own relationshipsD. Advise the parents to solicit feedback from their daughter on why she has emotional outbursts
The PMHNP is meeting with a husband and wife and observes that the husband is able to maintain his composure while the wife becomes more teary and emotional throughout the session. Which principle is used to describe this observation?A. relationshipB. relationshipC.D. All of the above
The PMHNP is meeting with a family consisting of two parents and their 10-year-old son. The parents are concerned about the child’s behavior. “He keeps disobeying us. All he does is misbehave,” the mother cries. The PMHNP meets individually with the son for a few sessions to learn more about his behavior and identifies that he is participating in attention-seeking behaviors. When the PMHNP invites the parents and son back to a family group setting, what action made by the PMHNP supports the use of constructivism?A. Providing the parents with consequences to use when the child misbehavesB. Confirming that the child is, in fact, misbehavingC. Getting the parents to think about their child as being hyperactive, rather than misbehavingD.
The PMHNP is working with a married couple in a family session setting. The wife reports feeling upset because her husband does not pay attention to her. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.Which statement made by the PMHNP will challenge the wife to see things differently?A. “Why do you think …?”B. “How does it make you feel …?”C. “How might you be contributing to your husband not paying you any attention?”D. “What can you say to your husband to get him to change his actions?”
The PMHNP is working with a father and his teenage daughter. The father has full custody of his daughter as of recently. He reports that the two of them get into arguments all the time over curfew, chores, and the daughter’s lack of responsibility that “she gets from her mother.” The daughter feels like the father never listens to her. Which of the following actions taken by the PMHNP demonstrates unbalancing the relationship?A. Telling the father that he might be patient enough with the newness of having a teenage daughter in the house all the timeB. Asking the daughter to describe how she feels about the transition of living with her father full timeC. Inviting the father to speak directly to the daughter about what she can do to accommodate his lifestyleD. Recommending the father find a hobby outside of the house to give his daughter alone time
A man calls a PMHNP to set up an initial appointment for family therapy. He explains, “My wife lost her job several months ago. She has been angry and less patient with the kids.Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers. All of the stress is taking a toll on me. I can’t focus at the office and I’m mentally exhausted at home.” Based on this phone contact, who would the PMHNP most likely choose to see for the first session?A. TheB. TheC. The couple aloneD. The
The PMHNP is assessing a family that consists of a mother and a father and their daughter Rachel. The family is discussing the issue of time management in the home, particularly involving the daughter’s extracurricular schedule. The mother asks, “Rachel, how many times has your father been late to pick you up from soccer?” What does the PMHNP take away from this interaction?A. The family uses a … response to conflict.B. The family is …nother.C. The family is involved inD. The family requires
The PMHNP meets with the parents of a 3-year-old boy, who was adopted at 6 months of age. The parents ask the PMHNP if he will see the child individually for therapy sessions on a weekly basis, based on the fact that the parents are having difficulty getting their son to listen to them. Which statement made by the PMHNP supports the systems theory approach to treatment?A. “It would be difficult for me to make sense of your .”B. “It would be better for us to …issues.”C.D.
The PMHNP is working with a ….. The husband wants to tell the wife that he needs alone time, but he doesn’t want to hurt her feelings. Which pretend technique can the PMHNP use with the couple?A. would say about his behaviorB. Ask theC. Tell the hree times a dayD. A and C
The PMHNP is working with a single mother and her adolescent son. The mother reports to the PMHNP that all she wants is for her son to call her when he is going to be late to dinner, so that she doesn’t worry about where he is. The son explains that his mom is “too paranoid” and calls or texts him constantly throughout the day, even if it doesn’t have to do with his whereabouts. How can the PMHNP advise the mother and son to accommodate one another?A. Recommend the mother to ….to her son throughout the dayB. Recommend the son to …. is going to be lateC. Recommend the mother and son to …D.
A PMHNP is using a structural family therapy approach. During a family therapy session, a child says, “Is that what you really mean?” Tracking the phrase, the PMHNP discovers that the family often uses sarcasm when communicating. What is the appropriate next step by the PMHNP?A. Make each member apologize to the other whenever sarcasm is used during the sessionB. Ask the family to point out when a statement is sarcastic so others know they are jokingC. Listen for the use of sarcasm and, when it occurs, help members communicate more directlyD. Have members put a quarter in the “sarcasm jar” each time a sarcastic statement is used
The PMHNP is meeting with a set of parents and their 12-year-old son, who according to the parents is fearful of “nearly everything.” The son admits that he does not like to ride his bike, play with his friends, or participate in activities such as sports, in which he could hurt himself or become dirty. What does the PMHNP say to the son to personify the problem using externalizing conversation techniques?A. “What can you do when you become scared of something?”B. “How is being fearful controlling your life?”C. “How often does fear make you do what it wants you to do?”D. “Why do you feel so fearful?”
A PMHNP is working with a mother and daughter to help them improve their communication skills. The mother explains that they have had numerous arguments caused by miscommunication lately. Using a structural family therapy approach, what is the appropriate response by the PMHNP?A. “Perhaps we can … and then observe how it unfolds so you can find some underlying causes.”B. “Please …, and then try that same enactment using a healthier approach.”C. “I’m going to ask you to ….your communication as a mother and as a daughter.”D.
During family therapy, a husband says to his …. family therapy approach, the PMHNP comments to the husband, “You feel like you are invisible and need to be heard.” Why does the PMHNP make this comment? NURS 6650 Midterm & Final Exam – Questions and Answers Walden Study GuideA. To …. patternsB. To get the ….C. To help the….xperienceD. To align with the client as a gesture of supportiveness
A family is in therapy because they have been unable to resolve conflicts and are arguing frequently. When using a….therapy approach, which of the following directives might the PMHNP suggest to create a ….A. Encourage the family to address concerns by ….B. Direct the family to …. become overly dependent on one anotherC. Ask the family to engage in pleasant activities following the problem behaviorD. Exaggerate in a fun family ritual by preparing for the event in a specific order
The PMHNP is meeting with a family that consists of a husband, wife, and the wife’s mother and sister. The husband complains to the PMHNP that the way his mother-in-law and sister-in-law barge into their home whenever they want, without any warning, is becoming intrusive. He says, “Because, of course, everyone in the family has keys to our home.” Which pattern does the PMHNP identify in this family relationship?A. The family is disengaged.B.C. The family is triangulating.D. The family is stereotyping roles.
The PMHNP is meeting with two women, ages 35 and 42, who are concerned about their mother’s use of alcohol. During the meeting, what question(s) should the PMHNP ask the mother to help uncover the potential drinking problem?A. “Why do you want ?”B. “How many drinks ?”C. “Do you ever drink ?”D.
During the initial assessment of a newly married couple, the PMHNP learns that they decided to come to family therapy in order to address their ….. Which of the following actions taken by the PMHNP demonstrates the use of the …. approach?A. Drawing a communication model for the couple and having them discuss where the communication breakdown occursB. Having the couple take turns describing, in their own words, what the communication problem isC. Asking the couple how things will be different in their relationship once their communication problems are solvedD.
The PMHNP is leading a group session when a group member who is usually quiet angrily interrupts another group member. He then apologizes for his outburst and explains that he has been having a hard time since his only child left for college. Using a person-centered approach to group psychotherapy, which of the following is the most appropriate response by the PMHNP?A. “Thanks for your apology. Do you think the reason you are having a hard time might be related to your fear of abandonment?”B. “You sound angry. Can you elaborate on what you are experiencing now as you share this story with the rest of the group?”C. “You have been unusually quiet for the past few sessions until today. Now, you seem depressed. Have you noticed this?”D. “It’s understandable that you are having a hard time. Let’s ask group members to share about the experience of having an empty nest.”
The PMHNP is meeting with a mother and her adult daughter, who report that they have had a hard time getting long. The adult daughter complains that her mother tells her what to do regarding her children, which puts strain on the adult daughter’s marriage. The mother denies this and explains that she is “only trying to help.” What does the PMHNP say to the mother or daughter to convey acceptance into this family?A. “I have a lot of respect for your .”B. “It sounds like you have a …. when you don’t ask for it.”C. “I have to …, since she is older and wiser.”D.
Members of a th…. and are being more open with each other. During the next session, the PMHNP decides to address termination of the group. Which of the following is the most appropriate response by the PMHNP when a group member expresses anxiety about termination?A. “Let’s have .”B. “Would someon….n?”C. “I think …..”D. All of the above
The PMHNP is working with a patient who is sleep deprived and depressed. Which of the following is an appropriate scaling question for the PMHNP to ask?A. “What have you done to keep your insomnia from getting worse?”B. “If 10 is the worst and 1 is the best, which number describes how tired you feel?”C. “What happens during the moments when you don’t feel insomnia?”D.
The PMHNP is providing family therapy to two parents and their twin 14-year-old children. The children become defiant around bedtime and are still working on their homework late into the night. How does the PMHNP employ an experiential technique of family sculpting?A. Asks one of the parents to arrange the family into a typical bedtime sceneB.C. Asks the twin children to explain why they do not want to go to sleepD. Asks the parents to talk to their kids about the importance of bedtime
Using a systemic family therapy approach, a PMHNP is meeting with a couple for an initial session and is asking each member to describe why he or she came to family therapy. After creating a genogram, the PMHNP says, “I can see that the men in your family are often the sole providers, and the women have been in charge of running the household.” Which is the most appropriate next response by the PMHNP?A. “Do you think this pattern is contributing to your issues?”B. “Do you see why this may be causing a dysfunctional relationship?”C. “This is likely the reason for your problems.”D.Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.
NURS 6650 MIDTERM & FINAL EXAM – QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS WALDEN STUDY GUIDEA PMHNP learns that the family has been experiencing …. because a mother and her teenage son have been getting ….. When using a …. therapy approach, which directive should the PMHNP suggest to solve the problem?A. Have the family of timeB. Encourage the fay solve itC. Ask the family to… amplifying the behaviorD.
The PMHNP is meeting with parents who are having difficulty …. The mother feels that the father is too strict but realizes that she is tired of getting “walked on” by their child. Which statement made by the PMHNP demonstrates the use of internal family systems therapy model? NURS 6650 Midterm & Final Exam – Questions and AnswersA. “Each person in the family has certain roles to fulfill. You might be taking on a less active role when it comes to disciplining your child because of the experiences you had in your own childhood.”B. “As a parent, you can create the dynamic and relationships you want. Maybe you could try asking your husband to be less strict with your child and see what kind of response you get from your child.”C. “It sounds like there’s a part of you that thinks your husband is too strict, but another part of you that thinks you should be stricter yourself. What does that second part of you look or sound like?”D. None of the above
The PMHNP is meeting with a married couple. The woman feels very insecure, particularly when it comes to her husband working with women in his office. She reports, “My girlfriends say that it’s not attractive to be insecure like I am, so I’m really making the problem worse by being so insecure.” How can the PMHNP externalize the woman’s problem?A. Have the woman talk to her husband directly about her concernsB. Help the woman free herself from the label of “insecure”C. Have the woman make a list of all the things about which she is insecureD.
The PMHNP is working with a married couple who have agreed to seek sex therapy due to the wife’s gradual decrease in interest in sex. The wife explains that she feels as though she cannot feel comfortable naked and enjoying being intimate. The PMHNP recognizes that the couple could possibly benefit from sensate focus. To apply the sensate focus exercise, the PMHNP suggests the couple first do what?A. Practice desensitizing themselves from sex so that they do not feel any anxietyB. Deprive themselves of sensations so that the urge builds up and the interest in sex resumesC. Find a time when they can be free from distraction and try to relaxD. Practice touching one another intimatelyThe PMHNP works with a husband and a wife, but in separate sessions, to address marital issues. One day, the wife asks the PMHNP how her husband is progressing with his therapy. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.Which response made by the PMHNP is most appropriate?A. “I’m sorry, but I cannot discuss his treatment with you, as it is private.”B. “I can only speak to you about his sessions if your husband gives me permission to.”C.D.
The PMHNP is meeting with a family composed of two parents and their two children. The PMHNP observes that the mother projects her concerns onto one of the children, and that child seems to conform to the parents’ way of thinking. The other child seems to be less involved in the family’s fusion. What action taken by the PMHNP demonstrates the use of the Bowen Family Systems Therapy model?A. Helping differentiate the child who is conforming to the parentsB. Helping differentiate the child who is less involved in the family fusionC.D.
The PMHNP is performing an ….orts arguing a lot and not getting along in general. When applying the theory of the family life cycle, what does the PMHNP say in response to this concern?A. “These sorts of experiences….t your relationship.”B. “It’s very common….of the house.”C. “This is an issue that can be worked out by reconstructing the events of your lives up until the point at which your son left for college.”D.
The PMHNP is meeting with a married couple who have recently had a baby. The transition of becoming new parents has caused a lot of friction and tension in the household. The wife wishes the husband would help out at least once with the nighttime feedings so she can get more than 3 hours of sleep at night. The husband feels like this is an unfair request, because the wife no longer works, but she still asks the husband to do a lot of errands during the day. What does the PMHNP do to create a quid pro quo contract between the husband and wife?A. Suggest the wife to agree to do more errands during the day, and then have the husband agree to do one nighttime feedingB.Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers. Convince the couple that this transition period with a new baby is normal and is not permanent, because soon the baby will start sleeping longer during the nightC. Recommend that the husband and wife spend more quality time together outside of the home and without the baby aroundD. Suggest that the wife consider going back to work to help even out the daily demands of working and parenting
The PMHNP is working with a family consisting of a father, a mother, and a daughter who is a sophomore in high school. The issue being discussed has to do with the daughter’s emotional outbursts about wanting to spend more time with her friends. Recently, the daughter blew up at the parents over the fact that they wouldn’t let her go to a party, since older kids from the school were throwing it. This outburst led to arguments in the household, which led to the daughter getting grounded for 2 weeks. Which theory does the PMHNP recognize as the most applicable?A. Systems theoryB. CyberneticsC. Social constructionismD. Attachment theory
The PMHNP is meeting with a mother and her 9-year-old child. The child is upset that the father left the house and hasn’t been back in a long time. Which action will the PMHNP perform to employ the role-playing technique with the child?A. Have the child draw his relationship to his father on a piece of paperB. Set up an empty space on the couch and have the child talk to the father as if he were sitting thereC. Ask the child to arrange a scene in the room of what would happen when the father comes back homeD.The PMHNP is working with a family that includes ….. The PMHNP defined the problem and goal in a previous session. Today, the PMHNP wants to find out whether the family has experienced any ….. What does the PMHNP identify as an …. that actually perpetuates the family problem?A. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.The parents fail to punish both children for stealing alcohol from the kitchen and drinking in their rooms.B. The children crave attention and affection, so the parents buy them each a motorized scooter.C. The wife wishes the husband would spend more time at home, and the husband tries to make her feel better by paying for a trip to visit her sister.D. All of the above
The PMHNP is working with parents who argue about ways to discipline their school-aged son. The PMHNP initiates enactment, telling the parents to discuss the disciplinary choices directly with each other. At what point does the PMHNP determine that the parents are demonstrating enmeshment?A. The mother interrupts the father while he is speaking.B. The father speaks on behalf of the mother when the PMHNP asks the mother a question.C. The father reports that the mother constantly babies their son by doing things for him that he is old enough to do for himself.D.
The PMHNP is working with 12-year-old twin sisters. Their parents report that the twins got into a big fight recently, which they haven’t been able to overcome. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.Which cognitive interaction can the PMHNP use to help the sisters gain a new perspective of the argument to help soften their own opinion of it? NURS 6650 Midterm & Final Exam – Questions and Answers Walden Study GuideA. Have the sisters play each other’s role in the argumentB. Encourage the sisters to write down why they believe they are rightC. Recommend the sisters write each other an apology letterD. Suggest the sisters find something they both like and can relate to
The PMHNP has just completed an intake assessment on a 15-year-old patient and believes the patient would benefit from family therapy. How does the PMHNP describe the goals of the therapy to the patient and the patient’s parents?A. “One goal of family therapy is to help the family understand each other and work together to form a strong family bond.B. “Our goal is ”C. “Our goal is toD. All of the above
The PMHNP is working with a family in a group setting. When employing the experiential technique, what action will the PMHNP take with the family during assessment?A. ConducB. Assess tC. Analyze each family member individually while they are in the same roomD. Ask the family members to participate in an association game
The PMHNP is meeting with a single father and his adolescent daughter. They have been “butting heads” because of the daughter’s differing opinions about her curfew and social life. They haven’t been able to communicate well. The PMHNP tries an experiential technique of family drawing. What will the PMHNP have the father and daughter do for this technique?A. Draw a picture as they see themselves in relation to one anotherB. Draw a picture of what they wish they could say to each otherC.D.
The PMHNP wants to identify the unique outcomes of a married couple who are having arguments about ….. In particular, the wife is concerned about her husband s…. consulting her. What question will the PMHNP ask to arrive at the unique outcomes?A. “How do these ….affect you?”B. “How do these ….your ideas about yourself?”C. “How does the …. affect the relationship you have with each other?”D. All of the above
The PMHNP is meeting with a mother and her teenage daughter; they are having trouble getting along. The mother complains that the daughter is defiant and never listens or goes out whenever she wants to. The daughter complains that the mother is too strict and won’t let her see her friends. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.What does the PMHNP do to employ the use of the paradoxical intervention technique?A. Tell the mother to be stricter with her daughter by imposing harsher consequencesB. Tell the daughter to make plans with her friends whenever she wants toC. Tell the mother and daughter to discuss how their actions affect each others’ feelingsD. A and B
The PMHNP meets with an older adult couple having marital problems. The husband and wife both admit to the PMHNP that it is difficult for them to speak to each other because of how much they disagree on things lately. The husband complains that the wife is always talking about their issues to their adult daughter. The wife reports that the husband does the same thing. Using the Bowen Family Systems Therapy model, what does the PMHNP interpret about this family dynamic?A. There is an emotional cutoff between the parents and their adult daughter.B. There is a great deal of fusion in the family.C. The parents are not dealing with their conflict by involving the daughter.D. All of the above
The PMHNP is meeting with a husband and wife who have separated but are trying to rekindle the marriage. The PMHNP asks the couple what they hope to gain from the sessions, and they provide the PMHNP with vague answers.Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers. What can the PMHNP can ask the couple to help them create better defined goals?A. “Specifically, how will you accomplish this?”B. “How will you know when you solved your problem?”C. “What will be the first sign that tells you that you are moving in the right direction?”D. All of the above
During a family therapy session, a 10-year-old girl says to her father, “You are at work all the time and are never around.” What is the most appropriate response by the PMHNP to improve communication?A.B. Ask the father what he heard when his daughter made that commentC. Tell the daughter that adults may have to work long hours sometimesD. Give the father a chance to explain why he is working all the time
The PMHNP is working with the parents of an 8-year-old. They are facing challenges with their daughter’s school because of her behavior toward other students. “Our daughter has become a problem,” they explain.Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers. Which statement(s) made by the PMHNP supports the use of the narrative therapy model?A. “Your daughter is facing a struggle against a problem but is not a problem herself.”B. “The problem is the problem, but the problem is not your daughter.”C. A and BD. None of the above
A group member realizes he gets anxious when making small talk and tends to talk only about himself. Using the principle of development of socializing techniques, what might the PMHNP recommend that the group do next? NURS 6650 Midterm & Final Exam – Questions and AnswersA. Give the member feedback on what the group participants have noticed about his interaction style, for example, if he does in fact talk only about himself when he seems anxiousB. Share emotions about similar struggles to improve cohesivenessC. Reflect on ways they can work together to achieve catharsisD. Discuss how the original family unit might relate to the problem
NURS 6650 MIDTERM & FINAL EXAM – QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS WALDEN STUDY GUIDEThe PMHNP is working with the parents of an adolescent daughter. The parents complain that the daughter is misbehaving and having emotional outbursts on a nightly basis. However, the parents cannot agree on ways to discipline and deal with the daughter.Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers. This leads to arguments between them. What does the PMHNP do to support the strategic use of rituals?A. Suggest the mom help the daughter with homework on even days of the weekB. Ask the dad how his daughter might describe the mother’s attitude in the houseC. Have the parents reframe their daughter’s symptoms to validate their own relationshipsD. Advise the parents to solicit feedback from their daughter on why she has emotional outbursts
The PMHNP is meeting with a husband and wife and observes that the husband is able to maintain his composure while the wife becomes more teary and emotional throughout the session. Which principle is used to describe this observation?A. Complementary relationshipB. Symmetrical relationshipC.D.
The PMHNP is meeting with a family consisting of two parents and their 10-year-old son. The parents are concerned about the child’s behavior. “He keeps disobeying us. All he does is misbehave,” the mother cries.Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers. The PMHNP meets individually with the son for a few sessions to learn more about his behavior and identifies that he is participating in attention-seeking behaviors. When the PMHNP invites the parents and son back to a family group setting, what action made by the PMHNP supports the use of constructivism?A. Providing theB.C. Getting the parents to think about their child as being hyperactive, rather than misbehavingD.The PMHNP is working with a married couple in a family session setting. The wife reports feeling upset because her husband does not pay attention to her. Which statement made by the PMHNP will challenge the wife to see things differently?A. “Why do you think your husband ignores you at home?”B. “How does it make you feel when your husband ignores you?”C. “How might you be contributing to your husband not paying you any attention?”D. “What can you say to your husband to get him to change his actions?”
The PMHNP is working with a father and his teenage daughter. The father has full custody of his daughter as of recently. He reports that the two of them get into arguments all the time over curfew, chores, and the daughter’s lack of responsibility that “she gets from her mother.” The daughter feels like the father never listens to her. Which of the following actions taken by the PMHNP demonstrates unbalancing the relationship?A.Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers. Telling the father that he might be patient enough with the newness of having a teenage daughter in the house all the timeB. Asking the daughter to describe how she feels about the transition of living with her father full timeC. Inviting the father to speak directly to the daughter about what she can do to accommodate his lifestyleD. Recommending the father find a hobby outside of the house to give his daughter alone time
A man calls a PMHNP to set up an initial appointment for family therapy. He explains, “My wife lost her job several months ago. She has been angry and less patient with the kids. All of the stress is taking a toll on me. I can’t focus at the office and I’m mentally exhausted at home.” Based on this phone contact, who would the PMHNP most likely choose to see for the first session?A. The husband aloneB. The wife aloneC. The couple aloneD. The family as a unit
The PMHNP is assessing a family that consists of a mother and a father and their daughter Rachel. The family is discussing the issue of time management in the home, particularly involving the daughter’s extracurricular schedule.Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers. The mother asks, “Rachel, how many times has your father been late to pick you up from soccer?” What does the PMHNP take away from this interaction?A. The family uses a fight or flight response to conflict.B. The family is dependent on one another.C. The family is involved in pairing.D. The family requires unfreezing.
The PMHNP meets with the parents of a 3-year-old boy, who was adopted at 6 months of age. The parents ask the PMHNP if he will see the child individually for therapy sessions on a weekly basis, based on the fact that the parents are having difficulty getting their son to listen to them. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.Which statement made by the PMHNP supports the systems theory approach to treatment?A. “It would be difficult for me to make sense of your child’s behavior without the rest of the family around.”B. “It would be better for us to meet as a group since your child likely has attachment issues.”C.D.
The PMHNP is working with a married couple who are having trouble communicating. The wife wants to ask for things from the husband, but she doesn’t want to be perceived as a nag. The husband wants to tell the wife that he needs alone time, but he doesn’t want to hurt her feelings. Which pretend technique can the PMHNP use with the couple?A. Ask the husband what he thinks the wife would say about his behaviorB. Ask the couple to engage in negotiationC. Tell the husband to call the wife a nag three times a dayD. A and C
The PMHNP is working with a single mother and her adolescent son. The mother reports to the PMHNP that all she wants is for her son to call her when he is going to be late to dinner, so that she doesn’t worry about where he is.Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers. The son explains that his mom is “too paranoid” and calls or texts him constantly throughout the day, even if it doesn’t have to do with his whereabouts. How can the PMHNP advise the mother and son to accommodate one another?A. Recommend the mother to limit her texts and calls to her son throughout the dayB. Recommend the son to send his mother a text when he is going to be lateC. Recommend the mother and son to stop being so hard on one anotherD.
A PMHNP is using a structural family therapy approach. During a family therapy session, a child says, “Is that what you really mean?” Tracking the phrase, the PMHNP discovers that the family often uses sarcasm when communicating. What is the appropriate next step by the PMHNP?A. Make each member apologize to the other whenever sarcasm is used during the sessionB. Ask the family to point out when a statement is sarcastic so others know they are jokingC. Listen for the use of sarcasm and, when it occurs, help members communicate more directlyD. Have members put a quarter in the “sarcasm jar” each time a sarcastic statement is used
The PMHNP is meeting with a set of parents and their 12-year-old son, who according to the parents is fearful of “nearly everything.” The son admits that he does not like to ride his bike, play with his friends, or participate in activities such as sports, in which he could hurt himself or become dirty. What does the PMHNP say to the son to personify the problem using externalizing conversation techniques?A. “What can you do when you become scared of something?”B. “How is being fearful controlling your life?”C. “How often does fear make you do what it wants you to do?”D. “Why do you feel so fearful?”
A PMHNP is working with a mother and daughter to help them improve their communication skills. The mother explains that they have had numerous arguments caused by miscommunication lately. Using a structural family therapy approach, what is the appropriate response by the PMHNP?A. “Perhaps ”B. “PleaseC. “I’m going to ask you to .”D. NURS 6650 Midterm & Final Exam – Questions and Answers Walden Study Guide
During family therapy, a husband says to his spouse, “When you ignore me, I can’t help but shout.” Using an emotionally focused family therapy approach, the PMHNP comments to the husband, “You feel like you are invisible and need to be heard.” Why does the PMHNP make this comment?A.Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers. To assist the couple in creating new attachment patternsB. To get the couple to recognize an intimate attachmentC. To help the client capture an elusive emotional experienceD. To align with the client as a gesture of supportiveness
A family is in therapy because they have been unable to resolve conflicts and are arguing frequently. When using a strategic family therapy approach, which of the following directives might the PMHNP suggest to create a sense of togetherness?A. Encourage the family to address concerns by writing letters to each otherB.C. Ask the family to engage in pleasant activities following the problem behaviorD. Exaggerate in a fun family ritual by preparing for the event in a specific order
The PMHNP is meeting with a family that consists of a husband, wife, and the wife’s mother and sister. The husband complains to the PMHNP that the way his mother-in-law and sister-in-law barge into their home whenever they want, without any warning, is becoming intrusive.Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers. He says, “Because, of course, everyone in the family has keys to our home.” Which pattern does the PMHNP identify in this family relationship?A. The family isB. The family isC. The family isD. The family is
The PMHNP is meeting with two women, ages 35 and 42, who are concerned about their mother’s use of alcohol. During the meeting, what question(s) should the PMHNP ask the mother to help uncover the potential drinking problem?A. “Why do you want to drink?”B. “How many drinks do you have in a day?”C. “Do you ever drink in the morning?”D. B and C
During the initial assessment of a newly married couple, the PMHNP learns that they decided to come to family therapy in order to address their communication problems. Which of the following actions taken by the PMHNP demonstrates the use of the solutions-focused approach?A. Drawing a communication model for the couple and having them discuss where the communication breakdown occursB. Having the couple take turns describing, in their own words, what the communication problem isC. Asking the couple how things will be different in their relationship once their communication problems are solvedD. NURS 6650 Midterm & Final Exam – Questions and Answers Walden Study Guide
The PMHNP is leading a group session when a group member who is usually quiet angrily interrupts another group member.Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers. He then apologizes for his outburst and explains that he has been having a hard time since his only child left for college. Using a person-centered approach to group psychotherapy, which of the following is the most appropriate response by the PMHNP?A. “Thanks for your apology. Do you think the reason you are having a hard time might be related to your fear of abandonment?”B.C. “You have been unusually quiet for the past few sessions until today. Now, you seem depressed. Have you noticed this?”D. “It’s understandable that you are having a hard time. Let’s ask group members to share about the experience of having an empty nest.”
The PMHNP is meeting with a mother and her adult daughter, who report that they have had a hard time getting long. The adult daughter complains that her mother tells her what to do regarding her children, which puts strain on the adult daughter’s marriage. The mother denies this and explains that she is “only trying to help.” What does the PMHNP say to the mother or daughter to convey acceptance into this family? NURS 6650 Midterm & Final Exam – Questions and Answers Walden Study GuideA. “I have a lot of respect for your desire to help your daughter.”B. “It sounds like you have a difficult time accepting your mom’s help when you don’t ask for it.”C. “I have to side with your mom on this issue, since she is older and wiser.”D. NURS 6650 Midterm & Final Exam – Questions and Answers Walden Study Guide
Members of a therapy group have become aligned and are starting to take ownership of their group experience. They are sharing more and are being more open with each other. During the next session, the PMHNP decides to address termination of the group. Which of the following is the most appropriate response by the PMHNP when a group member expresses anxiety about termination?A. “Let’s have ”B. “Would someone like to lead the discussion?”
NURS 6650 Midterm & Final Exam – Questions and Answers
nurs 6650 psychotherapy with groups and families midterm & final exam questions and answers

Evaluate psychotherapeutic approaches to group therapy for addiction

To prepare:

· Review this week’s Learning Resources and reflect on the insights they provide on group therapy for addiction.

· View the media, Levy Family: Sessions 1-7, and consider the psychotherapeutic approaches being used.

· Levy Family Episode 1 Program Transcript [MUSIC PLAYING] FEMALE SPEAKER: You’re not dressed? You’re going to be late for work. MALE SPEAKER: I’m not going to work. I’m sick. FEMALE SPEAKER: Of course you’re sick. You’re hungover. I don’t want the boys to see you like this. Go back to bed. MALE SPEAKER: See me like what? I told you, I’m sick. FEMALE SPEAKER: Well, what do you call it when someone is sick almost every morning, because they drink every night while they sit in the dark watching TV? MALE SPEAKER: You calling me a drunk? FEMALE SPEAKER: What do you call it? MALE SPEAKER: I call it, leave me the hell alone. FEMALE SPEAKER: Baby, you need to stop this. It’s tearing us up. The drinking, the anger– you’re depressed. MALE SPEAKER: You said, for better or worse. FEMALE SPEAKER: My vows don’t cover this. You were never like this before. You’ve changed. I want us back, the way we used to be. MALE SPEAKER: That way is dead. It died when I went to Iraq.Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

· Levy Family Episode 2 Program Transcript FEMALE SPEAKER: I want to thank you for getting me this Levy case. I think it’s so interesting. Just can’t wait to meet with the client. MALE SPEAKER: What do you find interesting about it? FEMALE SPEAKER: Well, he’s just 31. Usually the vets I work with are older. If they have PTSD, it’s from traumas a long time ago. But Jake, this is all pretty new to him. He just left Iraq a year ago. You know, I was thinking he’d be perfect for one of those newer treatment options, art therapy, meditation, yoga, something like that. MALE SPEAKER: Why? FEMALE SPEAKER: Well, I’ve been dying to try one of them. I’ve read a lot of good things. Why? What are you thinking? MALE SPEAKER: I’m thinking you should really think about it some more. Think about your priorities. It’s a good idea to be open-minded about treatment options, but the needs of the client have to come first, not just some treatment that you or I might be interested in.Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers. FEMALE SPEAKER: I mean, I wasn’t saying it like that. I always think of my clients first. MALE SPEAKER: OK. But you mentioned meditation, yoga, art therapy. Have you seen any research or data that measures how effective they are in treatment? FEMALE SPEAKER: No. MALE SPEAKER: Neither have I. There may be good research out there, and maybe one or two of the treatments that you mentioned might be really good ideas. I just want to point out that you should meet your client first, meet Jake before you make any decisions about how to address his issues. Make sense?

· Levy Family Episode 3 Program Transcript JAKE LEVY: We’d be out on recon in our Humvees, and it would get so hot. We used to put our water bottles in wet socks and hang them right outside the window just so the water would cool off of a bit, and maybe then you could drink it. Man, it was cramped in there. You’d be drenched, nowhere to breathe. It’s like riding around in an oven. And you’d have your helmet on you, 100 pounds of gear and ammo.Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers. I swear, sometimes I feel like it’s still on me, like it’s all still strapped on me. FEMALE SPEAKER: How many tours did you do in Iraq? JAKE LEVY: Three. After that last recon, I just– There were 26 of us. Five marines in the Humvee I was in. I remember I was wearing my night vision goggles. We passed through a village and everything was green, like I was in a dream or under water. And then there was a flash, bright light just blinded me. There was this explosion. I can’t– I can’t– FEMALE SPEAKER: It’s OK, Jake. Take it easy. I understand this is difficult. There’s something I;d like to try with you. It’s called exposure therapy, and it’s a treatment that’s used a lot with war veterans, especially those struggling with anxiety and PTSD. JAKE LEVY: Exposure therapy? FEMALE SPEAKER: Yes. It’s to help someone like yourself to confront your feelings and anxieties about a traumatic situation that you’ve experienced. It’s a– It’s meant to help you get more control of your thoughts, to make sense of what’s happened, and to not be so afraid of your memories. JAKE LEVY: Put that in a bottle and I’ll buy 10 cases of it. FEMALE SPEAKER: Well, one part of it is learning to control your breathing. And when you practice that, you can learn to manage your anxiety, to get more control of it, not let it control you, to protect yourself. Do you want to try it? JAKE LEVY: Right now? FEMALE SPEAKER: Sure. JAKE LEVY: Why not?

· Levy Family Episode 4 Program Transcript FEMALE SPEAKER: So do you want to try to go back to what you’re telling me before? LEVY: I can try. It was night. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.We were out on patrol. I remember it was so hot packed in our vehicle. Suddenly there was an explosion. We got tossed into a ditch. And somehow I made it out, and I could see it was the Humvee behind us. It’s whole front end was gone. It had hit a roadside bomb. Our vehicle had just driven past it, just mistriggering it. But not them. They didn’t make it. FEMALE SPEAKER: Remember how we practiced. Slow your breathing down. Inhale and exhale from your abdomen. LEVY: Thank you. FEMALE SPEAKER: And just take your time. Whenever you are ready. LEVY: So the bomb went off. I managed to get out. I had my night vision goggles on. And I could see the Humvee, the one that got hit. It’s whole front end was gone. And there’s this crater in the road. And inside it I could see– I could see Kurt’s– our platoon Sergeant, he was lying there everything below his waist was gone, blown off. And he was screaming. Screaming like nothing you’d ever heard. And then he was looking at me. And he was screaming for me to kill him.Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers. To stop his suffering. He was yelling, please. Please. And someone tried putting tourniquets on him. But the ground just kept getting darker with his blood. And I was staring into his face. I had my rifle trained on him. I was going to do it. You know. He was begging me to. I could feel my finger on the trigger. And I kept looking into his face. And then I didn’t have to do nothing. Because the screaming had stopped. He’d bled out. Died right there. And all I could think was I’d let him down. His last request, and I couldn’t do it. I couldn’t put a bullet in him so he could die fast not slow. FEMALE SPEAKER: I can see and hear how painful it is for you to relive this story. Thank you for sharing it. Do you think this incident is behind some of the symptoms you’ve been telling me about? LEVY: When I go to sleep at night, I close my eyes, and I see Kurt’s there staring at me. So I don’t sleep too good. That’s why I started drinking. It’s the only way I © 2013 Laureate Education, Inc. 1 Levy Family Episode 4 can forget about that night. So I drink too much. At least that’s what my wife yells at me. We’re not doing too well these days. I’m not exactly the life of the party. I left Iraq 10 months ago. But Iraq never left me. I’m afraid it’s never going to leave me alone.Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

· Levy Family Episode 5 Program Transcript FEMALE SPEAKER: It was such an intense story. I just kept seeing things the way he did, you know. The weird green of his night-vision goggles, his sergeant screaming for Jake to kill him. I just keep seeing it all in my head. [MUSIC PLAYING] MALE SPEAKER: Why, do you think? FEMALE SPEAKER: Why what? MALE SPEAKER: Why do you think you keep thinking about this story, this particular case? FEMALE SPEAKER: I don’t know, maybe because it’s so vivid. You know, I went home last night, turned on the TV to try to get my mind off it. And a commercial for the Marines came on, and there was all over again– the explosion, the screams, the man dying. Such a nightmare to live with, and he’s got a baby on they way. MALE SPEAKER: Could that be it, the baby? FEMALE SPEAKER: Maybe. That’s interesting you say that. I mean, the other vets I work with are older, and they have grown kids. But Jake is different. I just keep picturing him with a newborn. And I guess it scares me. I wonder if he Levy Family Episode 6 Program Transcript FEMALE SPEAKER: I know three of you did tours of duty in Iraq, and the others in Afghanistan. So I just wanted to follow up on that, talk about how you’re adjusting. [MUSIC PLAYING] MALE SPEAKER 1: You say adjust to, but there’s no adjustment. You’re just thrown back into your life like you’re supposed to pick up where you left off, but that’s a joke. Two years ago, I was dug in, pinned down by 50 Cal sniper fire, just praying the chopper would get me out alive.Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers. Now, the hardest part of my day is standing in the grocery store trying to decide if I want yellow or brown mustard with my hot dogs. JAKE: Nah, two six packs or a case. FEMALE SPEAKER: You find that you drink more than you used to? JAKE: Why not ask him if he finds he’s eating more hot dogs than he used to? BILL: You know why? JAKE: Why is that? Oh great, Buddha. BILL: Because I’ve been where you are. You talk about booze like it’s some joke, but nobody’s laughing. You can’t get adjusted to anything when you’re trying to get loaded. JAKE: I guess you won’t be joining me for a drink at the bar later. I was going to buy. FEMALE SPEAKER: No, that’s a good point, Bill. Sometimes we do things to avoid dealing with unpleasant feelings, like adjusting to life back at home. JAKE: What do you know about it? Give me a break. Back off, or I’ll make you. BILL: I drink too much too. But I’ve had enough of you mouthing off. JAKE: My wife’s had enough of me too. She’s the reason I’m here. We never used to fight. I never used to drink so much, but now I can’t stop myself from doing either. FEMALE SPEAKER: So why do you drink too much? © 2017 Laureate Education, Inc. 1 Levy Family Episode 6 BILL: It’s the only way I can shut it out, images of what I saw over there, horrible things that no one should ever have to see. I wake up some nights and I hear mortar rounds coming in. And I reach for my helmet and my weapon, but they’re not there. So I freak out. And then I see pretty curtains. TV’S on. And then I remember I’m at home. I realize I’m not going to get blown up after all. FEMALE SPEAKER: Thanks for sharing, Jake. You make a good point. It can seem a lot easier to self medicate rather than face the fears, the bad memories that we have. So what do you think? What are some other things, maybe, you do to avoid the challenge to being a civilian again?’ll be able to deal with it.Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

· Levy Family Episode 7 Program Transcript FEMALE SPEAKER: How did you find out? MALE SPEAKER: There’s a guy who served in our platoon. He didn’t call. Wrote an email. He said it would bother him too much if he talked about it. Sorry to be the one who tells you that Eric committed suicide last night. The last time I saw him, he said he was adjusting to civilian life pretty well. His girlfriend told me it wasn’t true. She said he told everyone he was doing fine. But the nightmares kept after him even when he wasn’t sleeping. It just tore him up. I guess he decided he’d had enough. He ended it with a service revolver. Marine to the end. FEMALE SPEAKER: I’m sorry, Jake. MALE SPEAKER: Thank you. You know, I spend almost every night in front of the TV, drinking until I can’t remember anything else. But I read that email last night, and I didn’t drink a drop. I just kept thinking about Eric. You know we went through Parris Island together? FEMALE SPEAKER: I didn’t know that. MALE SPEAKER: Yeah. I didn’t turn on the TV, either. I went straight to the computer.Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers. And before I knew it, I was reading about veterans and suicide. They say about 22 veterans commit suicide every day, 22. That’s like one every hour. Makes it sound like we’re time bombs. Makes you wonder which one of us is going to go off next. FEMALE SPEAKER: You sound glad that you didn’t drink last night. MALE SPEAKER: Yeah. I’ve been trying to quit for my wife. But that email– you know what else I read online? I checked all over with the VA, but it doesn’t look like they do anything to help prevent suicide.Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers. I mean, they offer help if you ask for it, but no prevention. Who’s going to ask for help, right? They train you to be stronger than everyone else, to endure. Asking for help is just not something most men do. FEMALE SPEAKER: Do you need help, Jake? MALE SPEAKER: I need a lot, but not like that. I’m not ready to check out yet. I got a baby on the way. © 2017 Laureate Education, Inc. 1 Levy Family Episode 7 I found out something else. I was reading about this veteran who committed suicide in another state. And they started this program in his memory that brings other vets together to help each other. FEMALE SPEAKER: Peer counseling? MALE SPEAKER: Yeah, that’s it. And I spent the whole rest of the night thinking, why don’t we have something like that? We should be reaching out to all vets, not just those who are already getting mental health services. I’d even volunteer to get something like that going. FEMALE SPEAKER: Well, that’s a great idea. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.But we’d need to find the money for a program like that. I mean, our budget is maxed out. We’d have to lobby the state legislature for the funding. MALE SPEAKER: Well, I’ll do it. I’ll write the letter. I want to try. FEMALE SPEAKER: Well, OK. MALE SPEAKER: I can’t let Eric go without doing something for him. For me, too

Evaluate psychotherapeutic approaches to group therapy for addiction

To prepare:

· Review this week’s Learning Resources and reflect on the insights they provide on group therapy for addiction.

· View the media, Levy Family: Sessions 1-7, and consider the psychotherapeutic approaches being used.

· Levy Family Episode 1 Program Transcript [MUSIC PLAYING] FEMALE SPEAKER: You’re not dressed? You’re going to be late for work. MALE SPEAKER: I’m not going to work. I’m sick. FEMALE SPEAKER: Of course you’re sick. You’re hungover. I don’t want the boys to see you like this. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.Go back to bed. MALE SPEAKER: See me like what? I told you, I’m sick. FEMALE SPEAKER: Well, what do you call it when someone is sick almost every morning, because they drink every night while they sit in the dark watching TV? MALE SPEAKER: You calling me a drunk? FEMALE SPEAKER: What do you call it? MALE SPEAKER: I call it, leave me the hell alone. FEMALE SPEAKER: Baby, you need to stop this. It’s tearing us up. The drinking, the anger– you’re depressed. MALE SPEAKER: You said, for better or worse. FEMALE SPEAKER: My vows don’t cover this. You were never like this before. You’ve changed. I want us back, the way we used to be. MALE SPEAKER: That way is dead. It died when I went to Iraq.Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

· Levy Family Episode 2 Program Transcript FEMALE SPEAKER: I want to thank you for getting me this Levy case. I think it’s so interesting. Just can’t wait to meet with the client. MALE SPEAKER: What do you find interesting about it? FEMALE SPEAKER: Well, he’s just 31. Usually the vets I work with are older. If they have PTSD, it’s from traumas a long time ago. But Jake, this is all pretty new to him. He just left Iraq a year ago. You know, I was thinking he’d be perfect for one of those newer treatment options, art therapy, meditation, yoga, something like that. MALE SPEAKER: Why? FEMALE SPEAKER: Well, I’ve been dying to try one of them. I’ve read a lot of good things. Why? What are you thinking? MALE SPEAKER: I’m thinking you should really think about it some more.Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers. Think about your priorities. It’s a good idea to be open-minded about treatment options, but the needs of the client have to come first, not just some treatment that you or I might be interested in. FEMALE SPEAKER: I mean, I wasn’t saying it like that. I always think of my clients first. MALE SPEAKER: OK. But you mentioned meditation, yoga, art therapy. Have you seen any research or data that measures how effective they are in treatment? FEMALE SPEAKER: No. MALE SPEAKER: Neither have I. There may be good research out there, and maybe one or two of the treatments that you mentioned might be really good ideas. I just want to point out that you should meet your client first, meet Jake before you make any decisions about how to address his issues. Make sense?Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

· Levy Family Episode 3 Program Transcript JAKE LEVY: We’d be out on recon in our Humvees, and it would get so hot. We used to put our water bottles in wet socks and hang them right outside the window just so the water would cool off of a bit, and maybe then you could drink it.Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers. Man, it was cramped in there. You’d be drenched, nowhere to breathe. It’s like riding around in an oven. And you’d have your helmet on you, 100 pounds of gear and ammo. I swear, sometimes I feel like it’s still on me, like it’s all still strapped on me. FEMALE SPEAKER: How many tours did you do in Iraq? JAKE LEVY: Three. After that last recon, I just– There were 26 of us. Five marines in the Humvee I was in. I remember I was wearing my night vision goggles. We passed through a village and everything was green, like I was in a dream or under water. And then there was a flash, bright light just blinded me. There was this explosion. I can’t– I can’t– FEMALE SPEAKER: It’s OK, Jake. Take it easy. I understand this is difficult. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.There’s something I;d like to try with you. It’s called exposure therapy, and it’s a treatment that’s used a lot with war veterans, especially those struggling with anxiety and PTSD. JAKE LEVY: Exposure therapy? FEMALE SPEAKER: Yes. It’s to help someone like yourself to confront your feelings and anxieties about a traumatic situation that you’ve experienced. It’s a– It’s meant to help you get more control of your thoughts, to make sense of what’s happened, and to not be so afraid of your memories. JAKE LEVY: Put that in a bottle and I’ll buy 10 cases of it. FEMALE SPEAKER: Well, one part of it is learning to control your breathing. And when you practice that, you can learn to manage your anxiety, to get more control of it, not let it control you, to protect yourself. Do you want to try it? JAKE LEVY: Right now? FEMALE SPEAKER: Sure. JAKE LEVY: Why not?Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

· Levy Family Episode 4 Program Transcript FEMALE SPEAKER: So do you want to try to go back to what you’re telling me before? LEVY: I can try. It was night. We were out on patrol. I remember it was so hot packed in our vehicle. Suddenly there was an explosion. We got tossed into a ditch. And somehow I made it out, and I could see it was the Humvee behind us. It’s whole front end was gone. It had hit a roadside bomb. Our vehicle had just driven past it, just mistriggering it. But not them. They didn’t make it. FEMALE SPEAKER: Remember how we practiced. Slow your breathing down. Inhale and exhale from your abdomen. LEVY: Thank you. FEMALE SPEAKER: And just take your time. Whenever you are ready. LEVY: So the bomb went off. I managed to get out. I had my night vision goggles on. And I could see the Humvee, the one that got hit. It’s whole front end was gone. And there’s this crater in the road.Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers. And inside it I could see– I could see Kurt’s– our platoon Sergeant, he was lying there everything below his waist was gone, blown off. And he was screaming. Screaming like nothing you’d ever heard. And then he was looking at me. And he was screaming for me to kill him. To stop his suffering. He was yelling, please. Please. And someone tried putting tourniquets on him. But the ground just kept getting darker with his blood. And I was staring into his face. I had my rifle trained on him. I was going to do it. You know. He was begging me to. I could feel my finger on the trigger. And I kept looking into his face. And then I didn’t have to do nothing. Because the screaming had stopped. He’d bled out. Died right there. And all I could think was I’d let him down.Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers. His last request, and I couldn’t do it. I couldn’t put a bullet in him so he could die fast not slow. FEMALE SPEAKER: I can see and hear how painful it is for you to relive this story. Thank you for sharing it. Do you think this incident is behind some of the symptoms you’ve been telling me about? LEVY: When I go to sleep at night, I close my eyes, and I see Kurt’s there staring at me. So I don’t sleep too good. That’s why I started drinking. It’s the only way I © 2013 Laureate Education, Inc. 1 Levy Family Episode 4 can forget about that night. So I drink too much. At least that’s what my wife yells at me. We’re not doing too well these days. I’m not exactly the life of the party. I left Iraq 10 months ago. But Iraq never left me. I’m afraid it’s never going to leave me alone.Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

· Levy Family Episode 5 Program Transcript FEMALE SPEAKER: It was such an intense story. I just kept seeing things the way he did, you know. The weird green of his night-vision goggles, his sergeant screaming for Jake to kill him. I just keep seeing it all in my head. [MUSIC PLAYING] MALE SPEAKER: Why, do you think? FEMALE SPEAKER: Why what? MALE SPEAKER: Why do you think you keep thinking about this story, this particular case? FEMALE SPEAKER: I don’t know, maybe because it’s so vivid. You know, I went home last night, turned on the TV to try to get my mind off it. And a commercial for the Marines came on, and there was all over again– the explosion, the screams, the man dying. Such a nightmare to live with, and he’s got a baby on they way. MALE SPEAKER: Could that be it, the baby? FEMALE SPEAKER: Maybe. That’s interesting you say that. I mean, the other vets I work with are older, and they have grown kids.Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers. But Jake is different. I just keep picturing him with a newborn. And I guess it scares me. I wonder if he Levy Family Episode 6 Program Transcript FEMALE SPEAKER: I know three of you did tours of duty in Iraq, and the others in Afghanistan. So I just wanted to follow up on that, talk about how you’re adjusting. [MUSIC PLAYING] MALE SPEAKER 1: You say adjust to, but there’s no adjustment. You’re just thrown back into your life like you’re supposed to pick up where you left off, but that’s a joke. Two years ago, I was dug in, pinned down by 50 Cal sniper fire, just praying the chopper would get me out alive. Now, the hardest part of my day is standing in the grocery store trying to decide if I want yellow or brown mustard with my hot dogs. JAKE: Nah, two six packs or a case. FEMALE SPEAKER: You find that you drink more than you used to? JAKE: Why not ask him if he finds he’s eating more hot dogs than he used to? BILL: You know why? JAKE: Why is that? Oh great, Buddha. BILL: Because I’ve been where you are. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.You talk about booze like it’s some joke, but nobody’s laughing. You can’t get adjusted to anything when you’re trying to get loaded. JAKE: I guess you won’t be joining me for a drink at the bar later. I was going to buy. FEMALE SPEAKER: No, that’s a good point, Bill. Sometimes we do things to avoid dealing with unpleasant feelings, like adjusting to life back at home. JAKE: What do you know about it? Give me a break. Back off, or I’ll make you. BILL: I drink too much too. But I’ve had enough of you mouthing off. JAKE: My wife’s had enough of me too. She’s the reason I’m here. We never used to fight. I never used to drink so much, but now I can’t stop myself from doing either. FEMALE SPEAKER: So why do you drink too much? © 2017 Laureate Education, Inc. 1 Levy Family Episode 6 BILL: It’s the only way I can shut it out, images of what I saw over there, horrible things that no one should ever have to see.Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers. I wake up some nights and I hear mortar rounds coming in. And I reach for my helmet and my weapon, but they’re not there. So I freak out. And then I see pretty curtains. TV’S on. And then I remember I’m at home. I realize I’m not going to get blown up after all. FEMALE SPEAKER: Thanks for sharing, Jake. You make a good point. It can seem a lot easier to self medicate rather than face the fears, the bad memories that we have. So what do you think? What are some other things, maybe, you do to avoid the challenge to being a civilian again?’ll be able to deal with it.Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

· Levy Family Episode 7 Program Transcript FEMALE SPEAKER: How did you find out? MALE SPEAKER: There’s a guy who served in our platoon. He didn’t call. Wrote an email. He said it would bother him too much if he talked about it. Sorry to be the one who tells you that Eric committed suicide last night. The last time I saw him, he said he was adjusting to civilian life pretty well. His girlfriend told me it wasn’t true. She said he told everyone he was doing fine. But the nightmares kept after him even when he wasn’t sleeping. It just tore him up. I guess he decided he’d had enough. He ended it with a service revolver. Marine to the end. FEMALE SPEAKER: I’m sorry, Jake. MALE SPEAKER: Thank you. You know, I spend almost every night in front of the TV, drinking until I can’t remember anything else. But I read that email last night, and I didn’t drink a drop. I just kept thinking about Eric. You know we went through Parris Island together? FEMALE SPEAKER: I didn’t know that. MALE SPEAKER: Yeah. I didn’t turn on the TV, either. I went straight to the computer.Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers. And before I knew it, I was reading about veterans and suicide. They say about 22 veterans commit suicide every day, 22. That’s like one every hour. Makes it sound like we’re time bombs. Makes you wonder which one of us is going to go off next. FEMALE SPEAKER: You sound glad that you didn’t drink last night. MALE SPEAKER: Yeah. I’ve been trying to quit for my wife. But that email– you know what else I read online? I checked all over with the VA, but it doesn’t look like they do anything to help prevent suicide. I mean, they offer help if you ask for it, but no prevention. Who’s going to ask for help, right? They train you to be stronger than everyone else, to endure. Asking for help is just not something most men do. FEMALE SPEAKER: Do you need help, Jake? MALE SPEAKER: I need a lot, but not like that. I’m not ready to check out yet. I got a baby on the way. © 2017 Laureate Education, Inc. 1 Levy Family Episode 7 I found out something else. I was reading about this veteran who committed suicide in another state.Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers. And they started this program in his memory that brings other vets together to help each other. FEMALE SPEAKER: Peer counseling? MALE SPEAKER: Yeah, that’s it. And I spent the whole rest of the night thinking, why don’t we have something like that? We should be reaching out to all vets, not just those who are already getting mental health services. I’d even volunteer to get something like that going. FEMALE SPEAKER: Well, that’s a great idea. But we’d need to find the money for a program like that. I mean, our budget is maxed out. We’d have to lobby the state legislature for the funding. MALE SPEAKER: Well, I’ll do it. I’ll write the letter. I want to try. FEMALE SPEAKER: Well, OK. MALE SPEAKER: I can’t let Eric go without doing something for him. For me, too

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Children’s physical development and movement is linked closely to other aspects of their daily learning. It is influenced by their growing confidence and enjoyment of physical play, by their increasing ability to control their own bodies through movement and by their physical well-being and strength.Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

As children develop physically, they become faster, stronger, mobile and more secure of their balance. They start to use these skills in a wider range of physical activities and also become aware of themselves as individuals. This developing sense of identity is linked closely to their own self image, self-esteem and confidence.

Therapies 4 Kids, Inc. has treated over 1,500 children from all over the world using these protocols for the last 6 years. These programs have resulted in life changing developmental gains and personal independence such as sitting, crawling, talking, walking and eating.

Therapies 4 Kids, Inc. is the leader in Pediatric Intensive Fitness programs for children and adults with neurological disorders such as Cerebral Palsy and Autism, or suffering from a Stroke. Our program offers FREE evaluations and assessments for all families. Call now and book your child’s appointment today! 954-828-0425.

Children’s physical development and movement is linked closely to other aspects of their daily learning. It is influenced by their growing confidence and enjoyment of physical play, by their increasing ability to control their own bodies through movement and by their physical well-being and strength.Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

As children develop physically, they become faster, stronger, mobile and more secure of their balance. They start to use these skills in a wider range of physical activities and also become aware of themselves as individuals. This developing sense of identity is linked closely to their own self image, self-esteem and confidence.

Therapies 4 Kids, Inc. has treated over 1,500 children from all over the world using these protocols for the last 6 years. These programs have resulted in life changing developmental gains and personal independence such as sitting, crawling, talking, walking and eating.

Therapies 4 Kids, Inc. is the leader in Pediatric Intensive Fitness programs for children and adults with neurological disorders such as Cerebral Palsy and Autism, or suffering from a Stroke. Our program offers FREE evaluations and assessments for all families. Call now and book your child’s appointment today! 954-828-0425.Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

Children’s physical development and movement is linked closely to other aspects of their daily learning. It is influenced by their growing confidence and enjoyment of physical play, by their increasing ability to control their own bodies through movement and by their physical well-being and strength.

As children develop physically, they become faster, stronger, mobile and more secure of their balance. They start to use these skills in a wider range of physical activities and also become aware of themselves as individuals. This developing sense of identity is linked closely to their own self image, self-esteem and confidence.Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

Therapies 4 Kids, Inc. has treated over 1,500 children from all over the world using these protocols for the last 6 years. These programs have resulted in life changing developmental gains and personal independence such as sitting, crawling, talking, walking and eating.

The PMHNP is meeting with a husband and wife and observes that the husband is able to maintain his composure while the wife becomes more teary and emotional throughout the session. Which principle is used to describe this observation?

Complementary relationship
Symmetrical relationship
C.NURS 6650 Psychotherapy For Families And Groups Midterm And Final Exam Study Guide

D.
The PMHNP is meeting with a family consisting of two parents and their 10-year-old son. The parents are concerned about the child’s behavior. “He keeps disobeying us. All he does is misbehave,” the mother cries.Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

The PMHNP meets individually with the son for a few sessions to learn more about his behavior and identifies that he is participating in attention-seeking behaviors. When the PMHNP invites the parents and son back to a family group setting, what action made by the PMHNP supports the use of constructivism? NURS 6650 Psychotherapy For Families And Groups Midterm And Final Exam Study Guide

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Providing the
B.

Getting the parents to think about their child as being hyperactive, rather than misbehaving
D.The PMHNP is working with a married couple in a family session setting.

The wife reports feeling upset because her husband does not pay attention to her. Which statement made by the PMHNP will challenge the wife to see things differently?

“Why do you think your husband ignores you at home?”
“How does it make you feel when your husband ignores you?”
“How might you be contributing to your husband not paying you any attention?”
NURS 6650 Psychotherapy For Families And Groups Midterm And Final Exam Study Guide

“What can you say to your husband to get him to change his actions?”
The PMHNP is working with a father and his teenage daughter. The father has full custody of his daughter as of recently. He reports that the two of them get into arguments all the time over curfew, chores, and the daughter’s lack of responsibility that “she gets from her mother.” The daughter feels like the father never listens to her. Which of the following actions taken by the PMHNP demonstrates unbalancing the relationship?
Telling the father that he might be patient enough with the newness of having a teenage daughter in the house all the time
Asking the daughter to describe how she feels about the transition of living with her father full time
Inviting the father to speak directly to the daughter about what she can do to accommodate his lifestyle
Recommending the father find a hobby outside of the house to give his daughter alone time
A man calls a PMHNP to set up an initial appointment for family therapy. He explains, “My wife lost her job several months ago. She has been angry and less patient with the kids. All of the stress is taking a toll on me. I can’t focus at the office and I’m mentally exhausted at home.” Based on this phone contact, who would the PMHNP most likely choose to see for the first session? NURS 6650 Psychotherapy For Families And Groups Midterm And Final Exam Study Guide
The husband alone
The wife alone
The couple alone
The family as a unit
The PMHNP is assessing a family that consists of a mother and a father and their daughter Rachel. The family is discussing the issue of time management in the home, particularly involving the daughter’s extracurricular schedule. The mother asks, “Rachel, how many times has your father been late to pick you up from soccer?” What does the PMHNP take away from this interaction?
The family uses a fight or flight response to conflict.
The family is dependent on one another. NURS 6650 Psychotherapy For Families And Groups Midterm And Final Exam Study Guide
The family is involved in pairing.Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.
The family requires unfreezing.
The PMHNP meets with the parents of a 3-year-old boy, who was adopted at 6 months of age. The parents ask the PMHNP if he will see the child individually for therapy sessions on a weekly basis, based on the fact that the parents are having difficulty getting their son to listen to them. Which statement made by the PMHNP supports the systems theory approach to treatment? NURS 6650 Psychotherapy For Families And Groups Midterm And Final Exam Study Guide
“It would be difficult for me to make sense of your child’s behavior without the rest of the family around.”
“It would be better for us to meet as a group since your child likely has attachment issues.”
C.NURS 6650 Psychotherapy For Families And Groups Midterm And Final Exam Study Guide

D.
The PMHNP is working with a married couple who are having trouble communicating. The wife wants to ask for things from the husband, but she doesn’t want to be perceived as a nag. The husband wants to tell the wife that he needs alone time, but he doesn’t want to hurt her feelings. Which pretend technique can the PMHNP use with the couple? NURS 6650 Psychotherapy For Families And Groups Midterm And Final Exam Study Guide

Ask the husband what he thinks the wife would say about his behavior
Ask the couple to engage in negotiation
Tell the husband to call the wife a nag three times a day
A and C
The PMHNP is working with a single mother and her adolescent son. The mother reports to the PMHNP that all she wants is for her son to call her when he is going to be late to dinner, so that she doesn’t worry about where he is. The son explains that his mom is “too paranoid” and calls or texts him constantly throughout the day, even if it doesn’t have to do with his whereabouts. How can the PMHNP advise the mother and son to accommodate one another?
Recommend the mother to limit her texts and calls to her son throughout the day
Recommend the son to send his mother a text when he is going to be late
Recommend the mother and son to stop being so hard on one another
D.NURS 6650 Psychotherapy For Families And Groups Midterm And Final Exam Study Guide
A PMHNP is using a structural family therapy approach. During a family therapy session, a child says, “Is that what you really mean?” Tracking the phrase, the PMHNP discovers that the family often uses sarcasm when communicating. What is the appropriate next step by the PMHNP?

NURS 6650 Psychotherapy For Families And Groups Midterm And Final Exam Study Guide

Make each member apologize to the other whenever sarcasm is used during the session
Ask the family to point out when a statement is sarcastic so others know they are joking
Listen for the use of sarcasm and, when it occurs, help members communicate more directly
Have members put a quarter in the “sarcasm jar” each time a sarcastic statement is used
The PMHNP is meeting with a set of parents and their 12-year-old son, who according to the parents is fearful of “nearly everything.” The son admits that he does not like to ride his bike, play with his friends, or participate in activities such as sports, in which he could hurt himself or become dirty. What does the PMHNP say to the son to personify the problem using externalizing conversation techniques?
“What can you do when you become scared of something?”
“How is being fearful controlling your life?” NURS 6650 Psychotherapy For Families And Groups Midterm And Final Exam Study Guide
“How often does fear make you do what it wants you to do?”
“Why do you feel so fearful?”
A PMHNP is working with a mother and daughter to help them improve their communication skills. The mother explains that they have had numerous arguments caused by miscommunication lately. Using a structural family therapy approach, what is the appropriate response by the PMHNP? NURS 6650 Psychotherapy For Families And Groups Midterm And Final Exam Study Guide
“Perhaps ”
“Please
“I’m going to ask you to .”
NURS 6650 Psychotherapy For Families And Groups Midterm And Final Exam Study Guide
During family therapy, a husband says to his spouse, “When you ignore me, I can’t help but shout.” Using an emotionally focused family therapy approach, the PMHNP comments to the husband, “You feel like you are invisible and need to be heard.” Why does the PMHNP make this comment?

To assist the couple in creating new attachment patterns
To get the couple to recognize an intimate attachment
To help the client capture an elusive emotional experience
To align with the client as a gesture of supportiveness
A family is in therapy because they have been unable to resolve conflicts and are arguing frequently. When using a strategic family therapy approach, which of the following directives might the PMHNP suggest to create a sense of togetherness?
Encourage the family to address concerns by writing letters to each other
B.NURS 6650 Psychotherapy For Families And Groups Midterm And Final Exam Study Guide

Ask the family to engage in pleasant activities following the problem behavior
D. Exaggerate in a fun family ritual by preparing for the event in a specific order

NURS 6650 Psychotherapy For Families And Groups Midterm And Final Exam Study Guide

In a 2- to 3-page paper, address the following:

Explain the group’s processes and stage of formation.
Explain curative factors that occurred in the group. Include how these factors might impact client progress.
Explain intragroup conflict that occurred and recommend strategies for managing the conflict. Support your recommendations with evidence-based literature. NURS 6650 Psychotherapy For Families And Groups Midterm And Final Exam Study Guide
American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (5th ed.). Washington, DC: Author.

Bélanger, C., Laporte, L., Sabourin, S., & Wright, J. (2015). The effect of cognitive-behavioral group marital therapy on marital happiness and problem solving self-appraisal. American Journal of Family Therapy, 43(2), 103-118. doi:10.1080/01926187.2014.956614

Bjornsson, A. S., Bidwell, L. C., Brosse, A. L., Carey, G., Hauser, M., Mackiewicz Seghete, K. L., & … Craighead, W. E. (2011). Cognitive-behavioral group therapy versus group psychotherapy for social anxiety disorder among college students: A randomized controlled trial. Depression and Anxiety, 28(11), 1034-1042. doi:10.1002/da.20877

Bond, C., Woods, K., Humphrey, N., Symes, W., & Green, L. (2013). Practitioner review: The effectiveness of solution focused brief therapy with children and families: A systematic and critical evaluation of the literature from 1990-2010. Journal of Child Psychology & Psychiatry, 54(7), 707-723. doi:10.1111/jcpp.12058

NURS 6650 Psychotherapy For Families And Groups Midterm And Final Exam Study Guide

Bonhote, K., Romano-Egan, J., & Cornwell, C. (1999). Altruism and creative expressions in a long-term older adult psychotherapy group. Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 20(6), 603-617. doi:10.1080/016128499248394

Cheston, R., & Jones, R. (2009). A small-scale study comparing the impact of psycho-education and exploratory psychotherapy groups on newcomers to a group for people with dementia. Aging & Mental Health, 13(3), 420-425. doi:10.1080/13607860902879409

Cohn, A. S. (2014). Romeo and Julius: A narrative therapy intervention for sexual-minority couples. Journal of Family Psychotherapy, 25(1), 73-77. doi:10.1080/08975353.2014.881696

Conoley, C., Graham, J., Neu, T., Craig, M., O’Pry, A., Cardin, S., & … Parker, R. (2003). Solution-focused family therapy with three aggressive and oppositional-acting children: An N=1 empirical study. Family Process, 42(3), 361-374. PMID: 14606200

NURS 6650 Psychotherapy For Families And Groups Midterm And Final Exam Study Guide

Crane-Okada, R. (2012). The concept of presence in group psychotherapy: An operational definition. Perspectives in Psychiatric Care, 48(3), 156-164. doi:10.1111/j.1744-6163.2011.00320.x

de Castro, S., & Guterman, J. (2008). Solution-focused therapy for families coping with suicide. Journal of Marital & Family Therapy, 34(1), 93-106. doi: 10.111/j.1752-0606.2008.00055.x.

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Escudero, V., Friedlander, M. L., Boogmans, E., & Loots, G. (2012). Alliance rupture and repair in conjoint family therapy: An exploratory study. Psychotherapy, 49(1), 26-37. doi:10.1037/a0026747

NURS 6650 Psychotherapy For Families And Groups Midterm And Final Exam Study Guide

Freedman, J. (2014). Witnessing and positioning: Structuring narrative therapy with families and couples. Australian & New Zealand Journal of Family Therapy, 35(1), 20-30. doi:10.1002/anzf.104

Freedman, J. (2014). Witnessing and positioning: Structuring narrative therapy with families and couples. Australian & New Zealand Journal of Family Therapy, 35(1), 20-30. doi:10.1002/anzf.1043

Gamble, J., & O’ Lawrence, H. (2016). An overview of the efficacy of the 12-step group therapy for substance abuse treatment. Journal of Health & Human Services Administration, 39(1), 142-160.

NURS 6650 Psychotherapy For Families And Groups Midterm And Final Exam Study Guide

Himelhoch, S., Medoff, D., & Oyeniyi, G. (2007). Efficacy of group psychotherapy to reduce depressive symptoms among HIV-infected individuals: A systematic review and meta-analysis. AIDS Patient Care & Stds, 21(10), 732-739.

Khawaja, I. S., Pollock, K., & Westermeyer, J. J. (2011). The diminishing role of psychiatry in group psychotherapy: A commentary and recommendations for change. Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience, 8(11), 20-23.Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

Kim, J. W., Choi, Y. S., Shin, K. C., Kim, O. H., Lee, D. Y., Jung, M. H., & … Choi, I. (2012). The effectiveness of continuing group psychotherapy for outpatients with alcohol dependence: 77-month outcomes. Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research, 36(4), 686-692. doi:10.1111/j.1530-0277.2011.01643.x

Koukourikos, K., & Pasmatzi, E. (2014). Group therapy in psychotic inpatients. Health Science Journal, 8(3), 400-408.

NURS 6650 Psychotherapy For Families And Groups Midterm And Final Exam Study Guide

L’Abate, L. (2015). Highlights from 60 years of practice, research, and teaching in family therapy. American Journal of Family Therapy, 43(2), 180-196. doi:10.1080/01926187.2014.100236

Lego, S. (1998). The application of Peplau’s theory to group psychotherapy. Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, 5(3), 193-196. doi:10.1046/j.1365-2850.1998.00129.x

Lerner, M. D., McLeod, B. D., & Mikami, A. Y. (2013). Preliminary evaluation of an observational measure of group cohesion for group psychotherapy. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 69(3), 191-208. doi:10.1002/jclp.21933

NURS 6650 Psychotherapy For Families And Groups Midterm And Final Exam Study Guide

Leszcz, M., & Kobos, J. C. (2008). Evidence-based group psychotherapy: Using AGPA’s practice guidelines to enhance clinical effectiveness. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 64(11), 1238-1260. doi:10.1002/jclp.2053

Marmarosh, C. L. (2014). Empirical research on attachment in group psychotherapy: Moving the field forward. Psychotherapy, 51(1), 88-92. doi:10.1037/a003252

McGillivray, J. A., & Evert, H. T. (2014). Group cognitive behavioural therapy program shows potential in reducing symptoms of depression and stress among young people with ASD. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 44(8), 2041-2051. doi:10.1007/s10803-014-2087-9

NURS 6650 Psychotherapy For Families And Groups Midterm And Final Exam Study Guide

McNeil, S. N., Herschberger, J. K., & Nedela, M. N. (2013). Low-income families with potential adolescent gang involvement: A structural community family therapy integration model. American Journal of Family Therapy, 41(2), 110-120. doi:10.1080/01926187.2011.649110

Méndez, N. A., Qureshi, M. E., Carnerio, R., & Hort, F. (2014). The intersection of Facebook and structural family therapy volume 1. American Journal of Family Therapy, 42(2), 167-174. doi:10.1080/01926187.2013.794046

Mojta, C., Falconier, M. K., & Huebner, A. J. (2014). Fostering self-awareness in novice therapists using internal family systems therapy. American Journal of Family Therapy, 42(1), 67-78. doi:10.1080/01926187.2013.772870

Nichols, M., & Tafuri, S. (2013). Techniques of structural family assessment: A qualitative analysis of how experts promote a systemic perspective. Family Process, 52(2), 207-215. doi:10.1111/famp.12025

Papero, D. V. (2014). Assisting the two-person system: An approach based on the Bowen theory. Australian & New Zealand Journal of Family Therapy, 35(4), 386-397. doi:10.1002/anzf.1079

NURS 6650 Psychotherapy For Families And Groups Midterm And Final Exam Study Guide

Patterson, T. (2014). A cognitive behavioral systems approach to family therapy. Journal of Family Psychotherapy, 25(2), 132-144. doi:10.1080/08975353.2014.910023

Perry, A. (2014). Cognitive behavioral therapy with couples and families. Sexual & Relationship Therapy, 29(3), 366-367. doi:10.1080/14681994.2014.909024

Pessagno, R. A., & Hunker, D. (2013). Using short-term group psychotherapy as an evidence-based intervention for first-time mothers at risk for postpartum depression. Perspectives in Psychiatric Care, 49(3), 202-209. doi:10.1111/j.1744-6163.2012.00350.x

Phipps, W. D., & Vorster, C. (2011). Narrative therapy: A return to the intrapsychic perspective. Journal of Family Psychotherapy, 22(2), 128-147. doi:10.1080/08975353.2011.578036

NURS 6650 Psychotherapy For Families And Groups Midterm And Final Exam Study Guide

Ramisch, J., McVicker, M., & Sahin, Z. (2009). Helping low-conflict divorced parents establish appropriate boundaries using a variation of the miracle question: An integration of solution-focused therapy and structural family therapy. Journal of Divorce & Remarriage, 50(7), 481-495. doi:10.1080/10502550902970587

Restek-Petrović, B., Bogović, A., Mihanović, M., Grah, M., Mayer, N., & Ivezić, E. (2014). Changes in aspects of cognitive functioning in young patients with schizophrenia during group psychodynamic psychotherapy: A preliminary study. Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, 68(5), 333-340. doi:10.3109/08039488.2013.839738

NURS 6650 Psychotherapy For Families And Groups Midterm And Final Exam Study Guide

Rice, A. (2015). Common therapeutic factors in bereavement groups. Death Studies, 39(3), 165-172. doi:10.1080/07481187.2014.946627

Ryan, W. J., Conti, R. P., & Simon, G. M. (2013). Presupposition compatibility facilitates treatment fidelity in therapists learning structural family therapy. American Journal of Family Therapy, 41(5), 403-414. doi:10.1080/01926187.2012.727673

NURS 6650 Psychotherapy For Families And Groups Midterm And Final Exam Study Guide

Safak, Y., Karadere, M. E., Ozdel, K., Ozcan, T., Türkçapar, M. H., Kuru, E., & Yücens, B. (2014). The effectiveness of cognitive behavioral group psychotherapy for obsessive-compulsive disorder. Turkish Journal of Psychiatry, 25(4), 225-233.Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

Saltzman, W. R., Pynoos, R. S., Lester, P., Layne, C. M., & Beardslee, W. R. (2013). Enhancing family resilience through family narrative co-construction. Clinical Child and Family Psychology Review, 16(3), 294-310. doi:10.1007/s10567-013-0142-2

NURS 6650 Psychotherapy For Families And Groups Midterm And Final Exam Study Guide

Sayın, A., Candansayar, S., & Welkin, L. (2013). Group psychotherapy in women with a history of sexual abuse: What did they find helpful? Journal of Clinical Nursing, 22(23/24), 3249-3258. doi:10.1111/jocn.1216

Sheehan, A. H., & Friedlander, M. L. (2015). Therapeutic alliance and retention in brief strategic family therapy: A mixed-methods study. Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, 41(4), 415-427. doi:10.1111/jmft.12113

​Szapocznik, J., Muir, J. A., Duff, J. H., Schwartz, S. J., & Brown, C. H. (2015). Brief strategic family therapy: Implementing evidence-based models in community settings. Psychotherapy Research: Journal of the Society for Psychotherapy Research, 25(1), 121-133. doi:10.1080/10503307.2013.856044

NURS 6650 Psychotherapy For Families And Groups Midterm And Final Exam Study Guide

Tasca, G. A. (2014). Attachment and group psychotherapy: Introduction to a special section. Psychotherapy, 51(1), 53-56. doi:10.1037/a0033015

Tasca, G. A., Francis, K., & Balfour, L. (2014). Group psychotherapy levels of interventions: A clinical process commentary. Psychotherapy, 51(1), 25-29. doi:10.1037/a0032520

Wang, C., Tzeng, D., & Chung, W. (2014). The effect of early group psychotherapy on depressive symptoms and quality of life among residents of an apartment building for seniors. Psychogeriatrics: The Official Journal of the Japanese Psychogeriatric Society, 14(1), 38-46. doi:10.1111/psyg.12037

Washington, K. T., Wittenberg-Lyles, E., Parker Oliver, D., Baldwin, P. K., Tappana, J., Wright, J. H., & Demiris, G. (2014). Rethinking family caregiving: Tailoring cognitive–behavioral therapies to the hospice experience. Health & Social Work, 39(4), 244-250. doi:hsw/hlu031

NURS 6650 Psychotherapy For Families And Groups Midterm And Final Exam Study Guide

Watkins, R., Cheston, R., Jones, K., & Gilliard, J. (2006). ‘Coming out’ with Alzheimer’s disease: Changes in awareness during a psychotherapy group for people with dementia. Aging & Mental Health, 10(2), 166-176. PMID: 16517492

Yildiran, H., & Holt, R. R. (2015). Thematic analysis of the effectiveness of an inpatient mindfulness group for adults with intellectual disabilities. British Journal of Learning Disabilities, 43(1), 49-54. doi:10.1111/bld.12085

NURS 6650 Psychotherapy For Families And Groups Midterm And Final Exam Study Guide

In the era of mass emigration and eldering society nursing is a very valuable and desirable profession. Student on this course must possess specialist knowledge about organization of patients’ healthcare process, therapeutic procedures and techniques, emergency rescue, rehabilitation process, preventive treatment, education and promotion of healthy lifestyle.
Professional nurse should be prepared to make quick decisions during their day-to-day work.Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

The Nursing programme is designed to implement theory into practice. Huge amount of programme hours is dedicated to nursing practice in hospitals and clinics. Our programme will
provide you with a solid grounding in all the key areas necessary for successful completion of your studies. To operate effectively within the healthcare environment, nurses are required to be able to implement and evaluate change by contributing to the ongoing development on their field.

Total didactic hours: 4790.
Over 3700 hours in core study programmes group, including:

Midwifery, Gynaecology and Gynaecological Nursing
Paediatrics and Paediatrics Nursing
Internal Diseases and Internal Medicine Nursing
Surgery and Surgical Nursing
Rehabilitation and Nursing of the Disabled
Geriatrics and Geriatric Nursing
Neurology and Neurological Nursing
Psychiatry and Psychiatric Nursing
Anaesthesiology and Nursing in a Threat to Life
Palliative Care
Principles of Medical Rescue
Dietetics
Research in Nursing
Benefits to You
High Salary – being a nurse means being well paid
The program is adjusted to the job market – nurses are most wanted on job market in EU
The study in English gives you a better chance for a career and overcomes the boundaries opening global job market for you
Professional staff – teachers with practice
Certification Opportunities

Levy Family Episode 1 Program Transcript [MUSIC PLAYING] FEMALE SPEAKER: You’re not dressed? You’re going to be late for work. MALE SPEAKER: I’m not going to work. I’m sick. FEMALE SPEAKER: Of course you’re sick. You’re hungover. I don’t want the boys to see you like this. Go back to bed. MALE SPEAKER: See me like what? I told you, I’m sick. FEMALE SPEAKER: Well, what do you call it when someone is sick almost every morning, because they drink every night while they sit in the dark watching TV? MALE SPEAKER: You calling me a drunk? FEMALE SPEAKER: What do you call it? MALE SPEAKER: I call it, leave me the hell alone. FEMALE SPEAKER: Baby, you need to stop this. It’s tearing us up. The drinking, the anger– you’re depressed. MALE SPEAKER: You said, for better or worse. FEMALE SPEAKER: My vows don’t cover this. You were never like this before. You’ve changed. I want us back, the way we used to be. MALE SPEAKER: That way is dead. It died when I went to Iraq.Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

· Levy Family Episode 2 Program Transcript FEMALE SPEAKER: I want to thank you for getting me this Levy case. I think it’s so interesting. Just can’t wait to meet with the client. MALE SPEAKER: What do you find interesting about it? FEMALE SPEAKER: Well, he’s just 31. Usually the vets I work with are older. If they have PTSD, it’s from traumas a long time ago. But Jake, this is all pretty new to him. He just left Iraq a year ago. You know, I was thinking he’d be perfect for one of those newer treatment options, art therapy, meditation, yoga, something like that. MALE SPEAKER: Why? FEMALE SPEAKER: Well, I’ve been dying to try one of them. I’ve read a lot of good things. Why? What are you thinking? MALE SPEAKER: I’m thinking you should really think about it some more. Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.Think about your priorities. It’s a good idea to be open-minded about treatment options, but the needs of the client have to come first, not just some treatment that you or I might be interested in. FEMALE SPEAKER: I mean, I wasn’t saying it like that. I always think of my clients first. MALE SPEAKER: OK. But you mentioned meditation, yoga, art therapy. Have you seen any research or data that measures how effective they are in treatment? FEMALE SPEAKER: No. MALE SPEAKER: Neither have I. There may be good research out there, and maybe one or two of the treatments that you mentioned might be really good ideas. I just want to point out that you should meet your client first, meet Jake before you make any decisions about how to address his issues. Make sense?Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

· Levy Family Episode 3 Program Transcript JAKE LEVY: We’d be out on recon in our Humvees, and it would get so hot. We used to put our water bottles in wet socks and hang them right outside the window just so the water would cool off of a bit, and maybe then you could drink it. Man, it was cramped in there. You’d be drenched, nowhere to breathe. It’s like riding around in an oven. And you’d have your helmet on you, 100 pounds of gear and ammo. I swear, sometimes I feel like it’s still on me, like it’s all still strapped on me. FEMALE SPEAKER: How many tours did you do in Iraq? JAKE LEVY: Three. After that last recon, I just– There were 26 of us. Five marines in the Humvee I was in. I remember I was wearing my night vision goggles.Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers. We passed through a village and everything was green, like I was in a dream or under water. And then there was a flash, bright light just blinded me. There was this explosion. I can’t– I can’t– FEMALE SPEAKER: It’s OK, Jake. Take it easy. I understand this is difficult. There’s something I;d like to try with you. It’s called exposure therapy, and it’s a treatment that’s used a lot with war veterans, especially those struggling with anxiety and PTSD. JAKE LEVY: Exposure therapy? FEMALE SPEAKER: Yes. It’s to help someone like yourself to confront your feelings and anxieties about a traumatic situation that you’ve experienced. It’s a– It’s meant to help you get more control of your thoughts, to make sense of what’s happened, and to not be so afraid of your memories. JAKE LEVY: Put that in a bottle and I’ll buy 10 cases of it. FEMALE SPEAKER: Well, one part of it is learning to control your breathing. And when you practice that, you can learn to manage your anxiety, to get more control of it, not let it control you, to protect yourself. Do you want to try it? JAKE LEVY: Right now? FEMALE SPEAKER: Sure. JAKE LEVY: Why not?

· Levy Family Episode 4 Program Transcript FEMALE SPEAKER: So do you want to try to go back to what you’re telling me before? LEVY: I can try. It was night. We were out on patrol. I remember it was so hot packed in our vehicle. Suddenly there was an explosion. We got tossed into a ditch. And somehow I made it out, and I could see it was the Humvee behind us. It’s whole front end was gone. It had hit a roadside bomb. Our vehicle had just driven past it, just mistriggering it. But not them. They didn’t make it. FEMALE SPEAKER: Remember how we practiced. Slow your breathing down. Inhale and exhale from your abdomen.Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers. LEVY: Thank you. FEMALE SPEAKER: And just take your time. Whenever you are ready. LEVY: So the bomb went off. I managed to get out. I had my night vision goggles on. And I could see the Humvee, the one that got hit. It’s whole front end was gone. And there’s this crater in the road. And inside it I could see– I could see Kurt’s– our platoon Sergeant, he was lying there everything below his waist was gone, blown off. And he was screaming. Screaming like nothing you’d ever heard. And then he was looking at me. And he was screaming for me to kill him. To stop his suffering. He was yelling, please. Please. And someone tried putting tourniquets on him. But the ground just kept getting darker with his blood. And I was staring into his face. I had my rifle trained on him. I was going to do it. You know. He was begging me to.Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers. I could feel my finger on the trigger. And I kept looking into his face. And then I didn’t have to do nothing. Because the screaming had stopped. He’d bled out. Died right there. And all I could think was I’d let him down. His last request, and I couldn’t do it. I couldn’t put a bullet in him so he could die fast not slow. FEMALE SPEAKER: I can see and hear how painful it is for you to relive this story. Thank you for sharing it. Do you think this incident is behind some of the symptoms you’ve been telling me about? LEVY: When I go to sleep at night, I close my eyes, and I see Kurt’s there staring at me. So I don’t sleep too good. That’s why I started drinking. It’s the only way I © 2013 Laureate Education, Inc. 1 Levy Family Episode 4 can forget about that night. So I drink too much. At least that’s what my wife yells at me. We’re not doing too well these days. I’m not exactly the life of the party. I left Iraq 10 months ago. But Iraq never left me. I’m afraid it’s never going to leave me alone.Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

· Levy Family Episode 5 Program Transcript FEMALE SPEAKER: It was such an intense story. I just kept seeing things the way he did, you know. The weird green of his night-vision goggles, his sergeant screaming for Jake to kill him. I just keep seeing it all in my head. [MUSIC PLAYING] MALE SPEAKER: Why, do you think? FEMALE SPEAKER: Why what? MALE SPEAKER: Why do you think you keep thinking about this story, this particular case? FEMALE SPEAKER: I don’t know, maybe because it’s so vivid. You know, I went home last night, turned on the TV to try to get my mind off it.Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers. And a commercial for the Marines came on, and there was all over again– the explosion, the screams, the man dying. Such a nightmare to live with, and he’s got a baby on they way. MALE SPEAKER: Could that be it, the baby? FEMALE SPEAKER: Maybe. That’s interesting you say that. I mean, the other vets I work with are older, and they have grown kids. But Jake is different. I just keep picturing him with a newborn. And I guess it scares me. I wonder if he Levy Family Episode 6 Program Transcript FEMALE SPEAKER: I know three of you did tours of duty in Iraq, and the others in Afghanistan. So I just wanted to follow up on that, talk about how you’re adjusting. [MUSIC PLAYING] MALE SPEAKER 1: You say adjust to, but there’s no adjustment. You’re just thrown back into your life like you’re supposed to pick up where you left off, but that’s a joke.Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers. Two years ago, I was dug in, pinned down by 50 Cal sniper fire, just praying the chopper would get me out alive. Now, the hardest part of my day is standing in the grocery store trying to decide if I want yellow or brown mustard with my hot dogs. JAKE: Nah, two six packs or a case. FEMALE SPEAKER: You find that you drink more than you used to? JAKE: Why not ask him if he finds he’s eating more hot dogs than he used to? BILL: You know why? JAKE: Why is that? Oh great, Buddha. BILL: Because I’ve been where you are. You talk about booze like it’s some joke, but nobody’s laughing. You can’t get adjusted to anything when you’re trying to get loaded. JAKE: I guess you won’t be joining me for a drink at the bar later. I was going to buy.Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers. FEMALE SPEAKER: No, that’s a good point, Bill. Sometimes we do things to avoid dealing with unpleasant feelings, like adjusting to life back at home. JAKE: What do you know about it? Give me a break. Back off, or I’ll make you. BILL: I drink too much too. But I’ve had enough of you mouthing off. JAKE: My wife’s had enough of me too. She’s the reason I’m here. We never used to fight. I never used to drink so much, but now I can’t stop myself from doing either. FEMALE SPEAKER: So why do you drink too much? © 2017 Laureate Education, Inc. 1 Levy Family Episode 6 BILL: It’s the only way I can shut it out, images of what I saw over there, horrible things that no one should ever have to see. I wake up some nights and I hear mortar rounds coming in. And I reach for my helmet and my weapon, but they’re not there. So I freak out. And then I see pretty curtains. TV’S on. And then I remember I’m at home. I realize I’m not going to get blown up after all. FEMALE SPEAKER: Thanks for sharing, Jake. You make a good point. It can seem a lot easier to self medicate rather than face the fears, the bad memories that we have. So what do you think? What are some other things, maybe, you do to avoid the challenge to being a civilian again?’ll be able to deal with it.Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

· Levy Family Episode 7 Program Transcript FEMALE SPEAKER: How did you find out? MALE SPEAKER: There’s a guy who served in our platoon. He didn’t call. Wrote an email. He said it would bother him too much if he talked about it. Sorry to be the one who tells you that Eric committed suicide last night. The last time I saw him, he said he was adjusting to civilian life pretty well. His girlfriend told me it wasn’t true. She said he told everyone he was doing fine. But the nightmares kept after him even when he wasn’t sleeping. It just tore him up.Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers. I guess he decided he’d had enough. He ended it with a service revolver. Marine to the end. FEMALE SPEAKER: I’m sorry, Jake. MALE SPEAKER: Thank you. You know, I spend almost every night in front of the TV, drinking until I can’t remember anything else. But I read that email last night, and I didn’t drink a drop. I just kept thinking about Eric. You know we went through Parris Island together? FEMALE SPEAKER: I didn’t know that. MALE SPEAKER: Yeah. I didn’t turn on the TV, either. I went straight to the computer. And before I knew it, I was reading about veterans and suicide. They say about 22 veterans commit suicide every day, 22. That’s like one every hour. Makes it sound like we’re time bombs. Makes you wonder which one of us is going to go off next. FEMALE SPEAKER: You sound glad that you didn’t drink last night. MALE SPEAKER: Yeah. I’ve been trying to quit for my wife. But that email– you know what else I read online? I checked all over with the VA, but it doesn’t look like they do anything to help prevent suicide.Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers. I mean, they offer help if you ask for it, but no prevention. Who’s going to ask for help, right? They train you to be stronger than everyone else, to endure. Asking for help is just not something most men do. FEMALE SPEAKER: Do you need help, Jake? MALE SPEAKER: I need a lot, but not like that. I’m not ready to check out yet. I got a baby on the way. © 2017 Laureate Education, Inc. 1 Levy Family Episode 7 I found out something else. I was reading about this veteran who committed suicide in another state. And they started this program in his memory that brings other vets together to help each other. FEMALE SPEAKER: Peer counseling? MALE SPEAKER: Yeah, that’s it. And I spent the whole rest of the night thinking, why don’t we have something like that? We should be reaching out to all vets, not just those who are already getting mental health services. I’d even volunteer to get something like that going. FEMALE SPEAKER: Well, that’s a great idea. But we’d need to find the money for a program like that. I mean, our budget is maxed out. We’d have to lobby the state legislature for the funding. MALE SPEAKER: Well, I’ll do it. I’ll write the letter. I want to try. FEMALE SPEAKER: Well, OK. MALE SPEAKER: I can’t let Eric go without doing something for him. For me, too

As you review the CRRN Exam Handbook while preparing for the CRRN exam, you are encouraged to use a variety of resources. What is the study method that works best for you? Individual review? Study group? Class? What types of materials are most helpful? Textbooks? Audio or video programs? Outlines? Memory aids like flashcards? You may also want to review the prepared sample questions to get a sense of the question format.Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

Know What is Covered
There are four major domains in the CRRN Exam Content Outline:

1. Rehabilitation nursing models and theories (6%)
2. Functional health patterns (theories, physiology, assessment, standards of care, and interventions in individuals with injury, chronic illness, and disability across the lifespan) (58%)
3. The function of the rehabilitation team and community reintegration (13%)
4. Legislative, economic, ethical, and legal issues (23%).

The CRRN Exam Content Outline lists each domain with related tasks, knowledge, and skill statements. It is the best source of information for exam content.Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

The RNCB does not sponsor or endorse any review course or other preparation materials.

Use Resources Created for Your Success
ARN has created the very best CRRN exam prep tools to help you while on your path to certification. There are a variety of tools to choose from based on how you prefer to learn! Each of these tools can be purchased in the ARN Bookstore, and at a deep discount to ARN members.

Online CRRN Review: A Knowledge Check
The newest prep tool from ARN is in online Q&A format for you to use when you want and at your own pace. Featuring 16 modules, the ARN Online CRRN Review helps you assess your knowledge in each of the exam domains and tasks. You may want to use this program first to assess your exam readiness.Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

The Specialty Practice of Rehabilitation Nursing: A Core Curriculum, 7th ed.
Published by ARN, this comprehensive book is used by many nurses to prepare for the CRRN exam, and is used continuously throughout your career as a rehabilitation nurse.

CRRN Flashcards
Portable and easy to use, the CRRN flashcards help you test your knowledge of individual rehabilitation nursing concepts.

CRRN Review Bundle
Our two most popular study tools have been combined to offer this bundle—The Specialty Practice of Rehabilitation Nursing: a Core Curriculum,7th ed. with the CRRN Flashcards.Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

Online PRN Course
This comprehensive, online course takes you on a deep dive into rehabilitation nursing interventions, chronic and disabling conditions seen in rehab, patient education, and more! Earn 22 CH once you have completed the course, post-tests, and evaluations.

Online CRRN Practice Test
Practice questions are presented in the same format as the CRRN exam.

CRRN Tips & Tricks Webinar
Hosted live in August 2018, this presentation helps you prepare for the exam by building familiarity with the exam content outline and reviewing topics like exam question types, online testing techniques, exam registration procedures, and testing center guidelines.Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

Additional Resources
Additional resources to help you prepare for the exam, include:

Carpenito-Moyet, L. (2016). Nursing diagnosis: Application to clinical practice (16th ed.). Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams and Willkes.

Hickey, J. (2013). Clinical practice of neurological and neurosurgical nursing (7th ed.). Philadelphia: Lippincott-Raven Publishers.

Jarvis, C. (2015). Physical examination and health assessment (7th ed.). St. Louis: Elsevier Health Sciences.Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

Karch, A. (2017). 2018 Lippincott pocket drug guide for nurses. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams and Wilkes.

Mauk, K. (2017). Gerontological nursing: competencies for care. (4th ed.). Boston: Jones & Bartlett.

Mauk, K. (2012). Rehabilitation nursing: a contemporary approach to practice. Boston: Jones & Bartlett.

McCance, K., Huether, S. (2014). Pathophysiology: the biologic basis for disease in adults and children (7th ed.). St. Louis: Mosby.

Potter, P., Perry, A., (2016). Fundamentals of nursing (9th ed.). St. Louis: Mosby.

Powell, S., Tahan, H. (2016). CMSA core curriculum for case management (3rd ed.). Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams and Wilkes.

Thibodeau, G. (2012). Anthony’s textbook of anatomy & physiology (20th ed.). St. Louis: Mosby-Year Book.Nurs 6650: Psychotherapy With Groups and Families Study Papers.

 

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