NURS-FPX4060 Assessment 1 Health Promotion Plan

NURS-FPX4060 Assessment 1 Health Promotion Plan

NURS-FPX4060 Assessment 1 Health Promotion Plan

Develop a hypothetical health promotion plan, 3-4 pages in length, addressing a specific health concern for an individual or a group living in the community that you identified from the topic list provided.

  • Bullying.
  • Teen Pregnancy.
  • LGBTQIA + Health.
  • Sudden Infant Death (SID).
  • Immunization.
  • Tobacco use (include all: vaping, e-cigarettes, hookah, chewing tobacco, and smoking) cessation.

Introduction

Historically, nurses have made significant contributions to community and public health with regard to health promotion, disease prevention, and environmental and public safety. They have also been instrumental in shaping public health policy. Today, community and public health nurses have a key role in identifying and developing plans of care to address local, national, and international health issues. The goal of community and public health nursing is to optimize the health of individuals and families, taking into consideration cultural, racial, ethnic groups, communities, and populations. Caring for a population involves identifying the factors that place the population’s health at risk and developing specific interventions to address those factors. The community/public health nurse uses epidemiology as a tool to customize disease prevention and health promotion strategies disseminated to a specific population. Epidemiology is the branch of medicine that investigates causes of various diseases in a specific population (CDC, 2012; Healthy People 2030, n.d.).

As an advocate and educator, the community/public health nurse is instrumental in providing individuals, groups, and aggregates with the tools that are essential for health promotion and disease prevention. There is a connection between one’s quality of life and their health literacy. Health literacy is related to the knowledge, comprehension, and understanding of one’s condition along with the ability to find resources that will treat, prevent, maintain, or cure their condition. Health literacy is impacted by the individual’s learning style, reading level, and the ability understand and retain the information being provided. The individual’s technology aptitude and proficiency in navigating available resources is an essential component to making informed decisions and to the teaching learning process (CDC, 2012; Healthy People 2030, n.d.).

It is essential to develop trust and rapport with community members to accurately identify health needs and help them adopt health promotion, health maintenance, and disease prevention strategies. Cultural, socio-economical, and educational biases need to be taken into consideration when communicating and developing an individualized treatment and educational plan. Social, economic, cultural, and lifestyle behaviors can have an impact on an individual’s health and the health of a community. These behaviors may pose health risks, which may be mitigated through lifestyle/behaviorally-based education. The environment, housing conditions, employment factors, diet, cultural beliefs, and family/support system structure play a role in a person’s levels of risk and resulting health. Assessment, evaluation, and inclusion of these factors provide a basis for the development of an individualized plan. The health professional may use a genogram or sociogram in this process.

What is a genogram? A genogram, similar to a family tree, is used to gather detailed information about the quality of relationships and interactions between family members over generations as opposed to lineage. Gender, family relationships, emotional relationships, lifespan, and genetic predisposition to certain health conditions are components of a genogram. A genogram, for instance, may identify a pattern of martial issues perhaps rooted in anger or explain why a person has green eyes.

What is a sociogram? A sociogram helps the health professional to develop a greater understanding of these factors by seeing inter-relationships, social links between people or other entities, as well as patterns to identify vulnerable populations and the flow of information within the community.

References

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2012). Lesson 1: Introduction to epidemiology. In Principles of Epidemiology in Public Health Practice (3rd ed.). https://www.cdc.gov/csels/dsepd/ss1978/lesson1/section1.html

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. (n.d.). Healthy People 2030. https://health.gov/healthypeople

Note: Assessment 1 must be completed first before you are able to submit Assessment 4.

Preparation

The first step in any effective project or clinical patient encounter is planning. This assessment provides an opportunity for you to plan a hypothetical clinical learning experience focused on health promotion associated with a specific community health concern or health need. Such a plan defines the critical elements of who, what, when, where, and why that establish the foundation for an effective clinical learning experience for the participants. Completing this assessment will strengthen your understanding of how to plan and negotiate individual or group participation. This assessment is the foundation for the implementation of your health promotion educational plan (Assessment 4).

You will need to satisfactorily pass Assessment 1 (Health Promotion Plan) before working on your last assessment (Assessment 4).

To prepare for the assessment, consider a various health concern or health need that you would like to be the focus of your plan from the topic list provided, the populations potentially affected by that concern or health need, and hypothetical individuals or groups living in the community. Then, investigate your chosen concern or need and best practices for health improvement, based on supporting evidence.

As you begin to prepare this assessment, you are encouraged to complete the Vila Health: Effective Interpersonal Communications activity. The information gained from completing this activity will help you succeed with the assessment. Completing activities is also a way to demonstrate engagement.

For this assessment, you will propose a hypothetical health promotion plan addressing a particular health concern or health need affecting a fictitious individual or group living in the community. The hypothetical individual or group of your choice must be living in the community; not in a hospital, assistant living, nursing home, or other facility. You may choose any health issues or need from the list provided in the instructions.

In the Assessment 4, you will simulate a face-to-face presentation of this plan to the individual or group that you have identified.

Please choose one of the topics below:

NURS-FPX4060 Assessment 1 Health Promotion Plan

  • Bullying.
  • Teen Pregnancy.
  • LGBTQIA + Health.
  • Sudden Infant Death (SID).
  • Immunizations.
  • Tobacco use (include all: vaping e-cigarettes, hookah, chewing tobacco, and smoking) cessation. (MUST address all tobacco products).

In addition, you are encouraged to:

Note: As you revise your writing, check out the resources listed on the Writing Center’s Writing Support page.

NURS-FPX4060 Assessment 1 Health Promotion Plan Instructions

Health Promotion Plan
  • Choose a specific health concern or health need as the focus of your hypothetical health promotion plan. Then, investigate your chosen concern or need and best practices for health improvement, based on supporting evidence.
    • Bullying.
    • Teen Pregnancy.
    • LGBTQIA + Health.
    • Sudden Infant Death (SID).
    • Immunizations.
    • Tobacco use (include all: vaping e-cigarettes, hookah, chewing tobacco, and smoking) cessation. (MUST address all tobacco products).
  • Create a scenario as if this project was being completed face-to-face.
  • Identify the chosen population and include demographic data (location, lifestyle, age, race, ethnicity, gender, marital status, income, education, employment).
  • Describe in detail the characteristics of your chosen hypothetical individual or group for this activity and how they are relevant to this targeted population.
  • Discuss why your chosen population is predisposed to this health concern or health need and why they can benefit from a health promotion educational plan.
  • Based on the health concern for your hypothetical individual or group, discuss what you would include in the development of a sociogram. Take into consideration possible social, economic, cultural, genetic, and/or lifestyle behaviors that may have an impact on health as you develop your educational plan in your first assessment. You will take this information into consideration when you develop your educational plan in your fourth assessment.
  • Identify their potential learning needs. Collaborate with the individual or group on SMART goals that will be used to evaluate the educational session (Assessment 4).
  • Identify the individual or group’s current behaviors and outline clear expectations for this educational session and offer suggestions for how the individual or group needs can be met.
  • Health promotion goals need to be clear, measurable, and appropriate for this activity. Consider goals that will foster behavior changes and lead to the desired outcomes.
Document Format and Length

Your health promotion plan should be 3–4 pages in length.

Supporting Evidence

Support your health promotion plan with peer-reviewed articles, course study resources, and Healthy People 2030 resources. Cite at least three credible sources published within the past five years, using APA format.

Graded Requirements

The requirements outlined below correspond to the grading criteria in the scoring guide, so be sure to address each point. Read the performance-level descriptions for each criterion to see how your work will be assessed.

  • Analyze the health concern that is the focus of your health promotion plan.
    • Consider underlying assumptions and points of uncertainty in your analysis.
  • Explain why a health concern is important for health promotion within a specific population.
    • Examine current population health data.
    • Consider the factors that contribute to health, health disparities, and access to services.
  • Explain the importance of establishing agreed-upon health goals in collaboration with hypothetical participants.
  • Organize content so ideas flow logically with smooth transitions; contains few errors in grammar/punctuation, word choice, and spelling.
  • Apply APA formatting to in-text citations and references exhibiting nearly flawless adherence to APA format.
    • Write with a specific purpose and audience in mind.
    • Adhere to scholarly and disciplinary writing standards and APA formatting requirements.

Before submitting your assessment for grading, proofread it to minimize errors that could distract readers and make it difficult for them to focus on the substance of your plan.

Competencies Measured

By successfully completing this assessment, you will demonstrate your proficiency in the following course competencies and scoring guide criteria:

  • Competency 1: Analyze health risks and health care needs among distinct populations.
    • Analyze a community health concern or need that is the focus of a health promotion plan.
  • Competency 2: Propose health promotion strategies to improve the health of populations.
    • Explain why a health concern or need is important for health promotion within a specific population.
    • Establish agreed-upon health goals in collaboration with hypothetical participants.
  • Competency 5: Apply professional, scholarly communication strategies to lead health promotion and improve population health.
    • Organize content so ideas flow logically with smooth transitions; contains few errors in grammar/punctuation, word choice, and spelling.
    • Apply APA formatting to in-text citations and references exhibiting nearly flawless adherence to APA format.

Teen Pregnancy Health Promotion Plan Example Paper

Teenage pregnancy is a global health issue and a significant health burden in the US. The rates have decreased gradually over the years, but the US is still the leading country in teen pregnancies, followed by New Zealand, England, and Wales. The rates in 2018 were 17.4 in 1000 teens, while in 2018 they dropped to 16.7 in 2019 (Williams-Breault, 2020). Teen pregnancy is associated with many consequences, such as school dropouts, stress due to parenthood at a young age, early and forced marriages, and birth complications such as obstructed labor due to cephalopelvic disproportions related to an underdeveloped pelvis. Teenage mothers take time to adapt to motherhood roles, affecting their psychological and academic life and demeaning the girls’ value of life. The proposed health promotion in this paper addresses teen pregnancy, with the target population being high school students in liberty high school.

High school students are most exposed to teen pregnancies due to age exposure and high school tendencies to try out things. In the US, three out of ten teens get pregnant while in high school, and half of the young mothers do not graduate from high school; they end up dropping out (Williams-Breault, 2020). High school students are often between 14 and 19 years, and most of them lack information on sex education despite engaging in sexual activities. Puberty onset causes a surge in hormones that increase sexual drive and attraction to opposite sexes. Most parents are overindulged in careers and thus neglect their children, and poor parenting leads to poor decisions and consequences such as teen pregnancy. Brown (2020) states that a lack of personal values and self-respect contributes to teen pregnancies.

Teen pregnancy is caused by various factors such as poor daughter guidance and parenting, having one parent taking care of the teen, substance abuse, and peer pressure. In addition, inadequate access to services tailored for the teens, engaging in unsafe sex practices, misinformation, or a lack of information on sexual and reproductive health also lead to increased teen pregnancies (Mathewos & Mekuria, 2018). As mentioned earlier, teenagers have high sex drives and love experimenting. They are less educated and thus unable to make the right decisions and portray responsible sexual behavior (Healthy People 2020, 2018).

Teens often pressure each other to begin irresponsible sexual behavior; some give in to pressure to show their guts and end up creating trouble in their lives. The factor contributing to teen pregnancy is multifactorial and vary with region. Teen education is a significant way of influencing and impacting this global health issue. According to Brown (2020), teens should be well-educated on teen pregnancy and sex education to eliminate the misconceptions around the topic and promote responsible sexual behavior.

Teens are often not exposed to sex education, and this social-cultural phenomenon can affect their concentration and participation in the health promotion program (Goldfarb & Lieberman, 2020). Prior information about the group is thus integral before the actual presentation. The goals of this health promotion plan revolve around correctly perched sex education, portraying responsible sexual behavior, and promoting speaking up among teens. The first goal is to communicate teen pregnancy’s risk factors, causes, and consequences to ensure informed decision-making processes and reduce the prevalence of irresponsible sexual behavior. The second goal is reinforcing understanding through rewards and valuation using the teach-back method. The evaluation method will ensure the teens are informed and help identify and rectify weaknesses. In addition, it will ensure that these teens are bold enough to stand up for their decisions and teach other students from their neighborhood about sex education.

The goals of the health promotion plan will be jointly made with the students. Participating in the goal-making process is integral. One advantage is that it will ensure that the goals adequately meet the learners’ needs. The participants may also suggest areas of interest that were less known to the facilitator, helping them meet their needs more adequately (McComas et al., 2020). It will also ensure the willingness and participation of the students. People often cooperate when involved in the decision-making process, giving the teachers an easy time. It also ensures collaborative effort during the event and higher chances of goal achievement. The students will clearly understand the set goals and objectives, which will help in personal decision-making and the much-needed behavior change. Hence, students’ participation in the goals-making process is integral.

Conclusion

Teen pregnancy is a global health issue and an issue of interest in the United States. The rates have dropped gradually over time, but they are still high. Teenage pregnancy is undesirable because it affects girls’ quality of life through physical, physiologic, and psychological effects. Educating teens on teen pregnancy and providing good sex education is integral to fostering responsible sex behavior and further reducing teen pregnancies. When facilitators involve participants in setting goals and objectives for a project, it enhances their involvement and achieving the overall goals.

References

Brown, S. S. (2020). What Will It Take to Further Reduce Teen Pregnancy in the US? Journal of Adolescent Health, 66(5), 522–523. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jadohealth.2020.02.009

Goldfarb, E. S., & Lieberman, L. D. (2021). Three decades of research: The case for comprehensive sex education. Journal of Adolescent Health, 68(1), 13-27. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jadohealth.2020.07.036

Healthy People 2020 (2018). Adolescent Health. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Adolescent Health. Retrieved 24th Dec 2021, from https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=2ahUKEwi8_r3Yjvz0AhV1QEEAHY6BA30QFnoECAMQAQ&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.healthypeople.gov%2F2020%2Ftopics-objectives%2Ftopic%2FAdolescent-Health&usg=AOvVaw0Fk12F5ES2rdH9SQuVAt_H

McComas, K. A., Arvai, J., & Besley, J. C. (2020). Linking public participation and decision-making through risk communication. In Handbook of risk and crisis communication (pp. 364–385) (1st Ed.). Routledge.

Williams-Breault, B. D. (2020). Teen pregnancy: United States vs. Europe. Int J Arts Humanit Soc Sci Studies, 5(6), 46-54. http://www.ijahss.com/Paper/05062020/1179451174.pdf

Health Promotion Plan Scoring Guide

CRITERIA NON-PERFOR

MANCE

BASIC PROFICIENT DISTINGUISHED
Analyze a community health concern or need that is the focus of a health promotion plan. Does not identify a community health concern or need that is the focus of a health promotion plan. Identifies a community health concern or need that is the focus of a health promotion plan. Analyzes a community health concern or need that is the focus of a health promotion plan. Provides an in-depth analysis of a community health concern or need that is the focus of the health promotion plan, and articulates underlying assumptions and points of uncertainty in the analysis.
Explain why a health concern or need is important for health promotion within a specific population. Does not describe a health concern or need that is important for health promotion within a specific population. Describes a health concern or need that is important for health promotion within a specific population. Explains why a health concern or need is important for health promotion within a specific population. Conclusions are not supported by relevant or current health data. Explains why a health concern or need is important for health promotion within a specific population. Conclusions are well supported by current and relevant population health and demographic data and based on a perceptive analysis of the factors that contribute to health, health disparities, and access to services.
Establish agreed-upon health goals in collaboration with hypothetical participants. Does not establish agreed-upon health goals in collaboration with hypothetical participants. Establishes health goals without hypothetical participant collaboration. Establishes agreed-upon health goals in collaboration with hypothetical participants. Establishes agreed-upon health goals in collaboration with hypothetical participants. Goals are realistic, measurable, and attainable.
Organize content so ideas flow logically with smooth transitions; contains few errors in grammar/punctuation, word choice, and spelling. Does not organize content for ideas. Lacks logical flow and smooth transitions. Organizes content with some logical flow and smooth transitions. Contains errors in grammar/punctuation, word choice, and spelling. Organizes content so ideas flow logically with smooth transitions; contains few errors in grammar/punctuation, word choice, and spelling. Organizes content with a clear purpose. Content flows logically with smooth transitions using coherent paragraphs, correct grammar/punctuation, word choice, and free of spelling errors.
Apply APA formatting to in-text citations and references exhibiting nearly flawless adherence to APA format. Does not apply APA formatting to headings, in-text citations, and references. Does not use quotes or paraphrase correctly. Applies APA formatting to in-text citations, headings and references incorrectly and/or inconsistently, detracting noticeably from the content. Inconsistently uses headings, quotes, and/or paraphrasing. Applies APA formatting to in-text citations and references exhibiting nearly flawless adherence to APA format. Exhibits strict and flawless adherence to APA formatting of headings, in-text citations, and references. Quotes and paraphrases correctly.

 

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